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C LIT 554 A: Digital Literary and Textual Studies

Meeting Time: 
MW 9:30am - 11:20am
Location: 
CMU 243
SLN: 
11709
Joint Sections: 
ENGL 504 A
Instructor: 
Leila K Norako

Syllabus Description:

English 504/Comp Lit 554—Colloquium in Digital Culture and the Digital Humanities

Kate Norako: lknorako@uw.edu

Office Hours: Wednesdays 3:30pm-5pm and by appointment

 

Description:

 

Nine years ago, the Chronicle of Higher Education called the digital humanities “the first ‘next big thing’ in a long time.” Today, the domain of the Digital Humanities encompasses research institutes, learned journals, Mellon fellowships, and an NEH mandate. Its language permeates the MLA convention program. It arouses messianic expectations and fiery condemnations in seemingly equal measure.

 

But what is it? The term “digital humanities” applies to a huge range of loosely related enterprises from coding with XML-based TEI standards to the critical study of digital culture and born digital literature to simply the dissemination of humanistic research in digital form. Rather than following any one path in this seminar, our objective will be to step back and survey the field as it has emerged and in its full institutional complexity. What does a graduate student in the humanities need to know about DH right now? Who are the major thinkers and what are the major debates? How might one situate oneself or one’s project in relation to the digital turn? To answer these questions – and raise new ones – we will meet in a twice weekly colloquium format and will explore a variety of critical topics that will include: project creation and management, close/distant reading, critical code studies and data visualization, the archive in theory and in practice, the intricacies of open access, to matters of equity and access within the digital humanities. To enliven and enrich our discussions, we will have three guest speakers visit campus throughout the quarter to visit our seminar and give public talks (which all members of the seminar are expected to attend): Angela Bennett (U of Nevada) on close and distant reading and data aggregation, Kimberly Christen (Washington State University) on the intersections of Indigenous Studies and the digital turn, and Kimberly Gallon (Purdue) on Black Digital Humanities.

 

Students will be evaluated on the following: their attendance and participation in class meetings and related public talks, their serving as a presenter and discussion leader on a chosen day during the term, an evaluation of an existing digital project in their field, and their successful completion of a final project, which will be comprised of an in-class presentation on a hypothetical digital project of their own creation and a mock grant application.

 

Practical issues of project-based scholarship, DH funding opportunities, and digital pedagogy will be covered. No prior technical knowledge or experience is assumed.

English 504 / Comp Lit 554 is a core graduate seminar in the Textual Studies Program. Course

credit can be applied towards the Textual and Digital Studies Graduate Certificate. For more

information, see http://depts.washington.edu/text.

 

Requirements:

 

  • Participate actively in class discussions. Do all reading, attend all sessions, and don’t use laptops or mobile devices in class for anything other than classwork.
  • Present on a designated unit (for days when we do not have a visitor). Presentations should (1) Distill the reading down to a 10-15 minute overview of what is central to the unit, and (2) Offer two questions for the ensuing class discussion
  • Produce a short assessment of an existing DH project in your field. See relevant assignment section in Canvas for details. Due 4/26, by 5pm in Canvas.
  • Propose a grant-funded DH project that would enrich your field and/or address a gap in the scholarship of your object(s). This assignment has two parts: a micro-conference in the week 9 where you will deliver a short (10 min) paper laying out a case for your proposed DH project, and a mock-application for a National Endowment for the Humanities DH Startup Grant (http://www.neh.gov/grants/odh/digital-humanities-startgrants), which will serve as your final paper. We will set aside some time in week 6 to workshop project ideas. See relevant assignment section for detailed instructions. Due June 7th, by 5pm on Canvas.

 

Grading Scale

 

3.7 and above = A (you’re doing fine)

3.6 and below = B (we should talk)

 

Course Schedule:

 

note: all readings in green are from Stommel and Kim’s Disrupting DH e-book, which I am asking folks to purchase.

 

Week 1: Introductions, Overview, Polemics

 

April 1st: What is DH (part the first)?

 

  1. Anne Burdick et al., from Digital_Humanities, and Daniel Allington, Sarah Brouillette, and David Golumbia, “Neoliberal Tools (and Archives): A Political History of DH”
  2. Matthew Kirschenbaum, “What is the Digital Humanities and What is it Doing in English Departments?”
  3. Adeline Koh, “A Letter to the Humanities: DH Will Not Save You”
  4. Pick ONE: Liana Silva, “Not Seen, Not Heard” or Maha Bali, “The Unbearable Exclusion of The Digital”

 

April 3rd: Disrupting DH

  1. Disrupting the Digital Humanities: Preface and Introduction
  2. Jesse Stommel “Public Digital Humanities”
  3. Meg Worely, “The Rhetoric of Disruption: What Are We Doing Here
  4. Pick ONE: Alan Liu, “Where is Cultural Criticism in the Digital Humanities?”; Tara McPherson, “Why are the Digital Humanities So White?”

 

Week 2: Project Management, Evaluation, and Code  

 

April 8th: Project Management and Evaluation

  1. Miriam Posner, “How Did They Make That?” and practical guides to DH project evaluation, design, and management.
  2. Assignment: Come to class on Wednesday with 1-2 digital projects you are considering for your assessment assignment (see prompt in canvas for details)

 

April 10th: On Coding and Critical Code Studies:

  1. Matthew Kirschenbaum, “Hello Worlds: Why Humanities Students Should Learn to Code”
  2. Mark C. Marino, “Why We Must Read the Code”
  3. Pick ONE -- Miriam Posner, “Some Things to Think About Before You Exhort Everyone to Code”, Evan Donahue, “A ‘Hello World’ Apart: Why Humanities Students Should Not learn to Program”
  4. Recommended background: Paul Ford, “What is Code?” (relevant parts)

 

 

Week 3 Equity, Access, and Ethics in DH, Part I (Kim Gallon)

 

April 15: Race, Feminism, Disability and DH

  1. Adeline Koh Interface 1:1 and 1:2
  2. Anne Cong-Huyen, “Race in DH: Transformative Asian/American Digital Humanities
  3. Kim Gallon, “Making a Case for the Black Digital Humanities”
  4. Kat Lecky, “Humanizing the Interface”
  5. Jonathan Hsy and Rick Godden, “Universal Design and its Discontents”
  6. Moya Bailey, “#transform(ing)DH Writing and Research: An Autoethonography of Digital Humanities and Feminist Ethics”

 

 

April 17: (Kim Gallon, Purdue) TBD readings assigned by Gallon

 

Week 4 Equity, Access, and Ethics in DH, Part II  

 

April 22nd: Race and DH, part II

  1. Robin Wharton, “Bend Until it Breaks: Digital Humanities and Resistance”
  2. Angel Nieves, DH as “Disruptive Innovation” for Restorative Social Justice: Virtual Heritage and 3D Reconstructions of South Africa’s Township Histories”
  3. Peruse the following: Torn Apart/Seperadosl http://www.latinopacificarchive.org/, Indigitization.ca, http://www.artsrn.ualberta.ca/orlando/, NativeLand.ca (project/map itself + blog), Moving Images of the Pacific Islands (http://dahi.manoa.hawaii.edu/2018/10/moving-images-of-the-pacific-island...)

 

April 24th: (Kimberly Cristen, Western Washington University) TBD Readings

Suggestions in the meanwhile: Christen, K. 2015, “Tribal Archives, Traditional Knowledge, and Local Contexts: Why the “s” Matters,” Journal of Western Archives.  Vol. 6 (1): Article 3;; “Opening Archives: Respectful Repatriation,” American Archivist Vol. 74 (1): 185–210.

 

Week 5 Close/Distant Reading (Angela Bennett)

 

April 29th: Readings TBD

May 1st: (Angela Bennet, Univ. of Reno) Readings TBD

current suggestions: A. R. Bennett, “The Ecology of Art-iculation and Aggregate Reading”; Bruno Latour, “Circulating Reference”.; Jeffrey Jerome Cohen and Stephanie Lemenager, “Introduction” to a PMLA special section on Eco-DHTop of Form

Bottom of Form

 

Week 6 Open Access in Theory and Practice; Text Encoding, Digital Editions, Archives

 

May 6th (Miceal Vaughan, UW) TEI and Digital Editions

  1. Susan Schreibman, “Digital Scholarly Editing”
  2. Martin Mueller, “A Very Gentle Introduction to the TEI” (feel free to skip middle section)
  3. Kate Singer, “Digital Close Reading: TEI for Teaching Poetic Vocabularies”
  4. Piers Plowman Electronic Archive, “About,” “Transcription Protocols: General Intro,” and brows the PPEA; introduction to Vaughan edition of Piers Plowman’s A-Version.

May 8th: Open Access in Theory and Practice

 

  1. Kathleen Fitzpatrick, “Open”
  2. Kimberly Christen, “Does Information Really Want to Be Free?: Indigenous Knowledge and the Politics of Open Access,” The International Journal of Communication, Vol 6: 2870-2893
  3. Matthew Battles and Jeffrey Schnapp, selections from The Library Beyond the Book
  4. Robert Darnton, “The Library: Three Jeremiads”;
  5. Chris Bourg, “The Library is Never Neutral”
  6. Pick One: Aaron Swartz, “Who Runs Wikipedia?”; Nathaniel Tkacz, “Wikipedia and the Politics of Mass Collaboration”
  7. Strongly Recommended: http://news.mit.edu/2019/open-access-task-force-releases-draft-recommendations-0318, Chris Bourg “Open as in Dangerous” (https://chrisbourg.wordpress.com/2018/04/17/open-as-in-dangerous/); explore Book Traces

 

Week 7: Data Visualization and GIS

 

May 13th: (Luke Bergmann, UBC/UW) 

  1. William Kretschmar, “GIS for Language and Literary Study” and selected GIS projects
  2. Luke Bergmann, “Toward Speculative Data: ‘Geographic Information’ for Situated Knowledges, Vibrant Matter, and Relational Spaces’”
  3. Johanna Drucker, “Humanistic Theory and Digital Scholarship"
  4. “Humanities Approaches to Graphical Display”
  5. “Temporal Modeling”from SpecLab

 

May 15th: Final Project Workshopping

 

Bottom of Form

 

Week 8:  Critical Making and Maker Movements

 

May 20th: (Daniela Rosner, UW)

  1. Edmond Y. Chang, “Playing as Making”;
  2. Matt Ratto, “Critical Making”
  3. Rosner, Daniela K. "5 Fabulating in Practice." In Critical Fabulations: Reworking the Methods and Margins of Design. MIT Press. Pages 101-120.
  4. Bennett, Cynthia, and Daniela K. Rosner. "The Promise of Empathy: Design, Disability, and Knowing the Other." In Proceedings of the 2018 CHI conference on human factors in computing systems. 2018.

 

May 22nd: Maker movements, pt. II

  1. Chan, Tiffany, Mara Mills, and Jentery Sayers. "Optophonic Reading, Prototyping Optophones." Amodern8 (2018).
  2. Zewde, Sara. “Trans-Atlantic Memory: Material And Immaterial Design at the Valongo Warf, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil”. Landscript 5. 2017.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/v8uhny4hs1zyaop/Zewde_Transatlantic%20Memory.pdf?dl=0

  1. Jentry Sayers, “Prototyping the Past”

 

Bottom of Form

Week 9: Student Presentations, DH Futures

 

May 27th: No Class

 

May 28th: Student Presentations

 

May 30th: Student Presentations (Time and location TBD)

For our Concluding Discussion:

  • Wendy Chun, Richard Grusin, Patrick Jagoda, and Rita Raley, “The Dark Side of the Digital Humanities”
  • Timothy Burke, “The Humane Digital”
  • Dorothy Kim “How to #decolonizeDH”

 

 

Week 10:

 

June 3rd and 5th: No formal classes due to DHSI, but students are asked to meet during class and use that time for peer-review and grant application trouble-shooting.

 

June 7th: Final Project due via Canvas by 5pm.

 

 

 

Students will be evaluated on the following: their attendance and participation in class meetings and related public talks, their serving as a presenter and discussion leader on a chosen day during the term, an evaluation of an existing digital project in their field, and their successful completion of a final project, which will be comprised of an in-class presentation on a hypothetical digital project of their own creation and a mock grant application.

English 504 / Comp Lit 554 is a core graduate seminar in the Textual Studies Program. Course credit can be applied towards the Textual and Digital Studies Graduate Certificate. For more information, see http://depts.washington.edu/text.

Catalog Description: 
An examination of digital textuality from the rise and fall of "hypertext" to contemporary convergence and transmediation in hybrid visual-verbal genres; computer games, digital video, and e-poetry. Coverage of practical issues surrounding digital scholarship and the digital humanities. Offered: jointly with ENGL 504.
Credits: 
5.0
Status: 
Active
Last updated: 
August 2, 2019 - 9:12pm
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