You are here

C LIT 511 A: Literary Translation

Literary Translation

Course Flyer: 
Meeting Time: 
TTh 12:30pm - 2:20pm
Location: 
MGH 085
SLN: 
22036
Instructor:
Photo of Cynthia Steele
Cynthia Steele

Syllabus Description:

 

images.jpg

SLN 22036

C LIT 511A: Literary Translation

Prof. Cynthia Steele

TTh 12:30-2:20                                         Office: Padelford C-502

Classroom: Mary Gates Hall 085                 Office hours TTh 2:30-3:20 and by appt

Office: Padelford C-502                              206-616-4085

cynthias@uw.edu

A graduate practicum in literary translation. You will turn in four sets of poetry translations and four of fiction, to be critiqued by other members of the seminar and then revised. At the end of the quarter, you will turn in a portfolio of your translations, each finalized and accompanied by a critical translator’s introduction, and a list of journals to which you will submit them for publication. In addition, you will work in pairs to make an oral presentation of the work of a prominent theorist or translator, or a comparison of three translations of the same English literary text. In addition to Umberto Eco’s book Mouse or Rat? Translation as Negotiation, we will read a series of essays by prominent scholars on the theory and practice of translation, including questions of translatability, fidelity, and the charged politics of translation. We will meet with two working translators, Tony Geist and Wendy Call, to discuss their work, as well as with Gabriella Page-Fort, the editorial director of AmazonCrossing, to discuss their literary translation series. A prerequisite for this seminar is demonstrable fluency in English plus another language.

Canvas Site:

https://canvas.uw.edu/courses/1113350

Readings:

Eco, Umberto. Mouse or Rat? Translation as Negotiation. Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 2013. Kindle Edition, $6. ASIN: B00RTY9FBU. Please purchase directly from Amazon.

Articles (posted to Canvas):

A1. Porter, Catherine. “Translation as Scholarship.” ADFL Bulletin 41.2 (2009): 7-13.

A2. Paul, Gill, ed. “Chapter Four: Translation Problems and Solutions.” Translation in Practice: A Symposium. Champaign: Dalkey Archive Press, 2009, pp. 41-58.

A3. Bly, Robert. “The Eight Stages of Translation.” The Kenyon Review 4.2 (Spring 1982): 68-89.

A4. Benjamin, Walter. “The Task of the Translator.” The Translation Studies Reader, ed. Lawrence Venuti. London: Routledge, 2000, pp. 1-11.

A5. Bly, Robert and Ben Belitt, Two Translations of Federico García Lorca, “City that Does Not Sleep,” from Poet in New York (1929-30).

A6. Geist, Tony. Selected translations from The School of Solitude: Collected Poems by Luis Hernández. Swan Isle Press, 2015.

A7. Call, Wendy. “Carrying Words Across Borders: Zapotec Poetry On/In Migration” and translations of selected poems by Irma Pineda. Michigan Quarterly Review 52. 2 (Spring 2013): 199-221.

A8. Walkowitz, Rebecca. “Close Reading in an Age of Global Writing.” Modern Language Quarterly 74.2 (June 2013): 171-195.

A9. Mayo, C.M. “How to Get Your Short Story Published.” The Writer 116.4 (Apr 2003): 40. 

A10. Apter, Emily. “Untranslatables: A World System.” New Literary History 39.3 (Summer 2008): 581-598.

CALENDAR

Date

In class

Due today

WEEK 1

Tues 3 Jan

Introduction

 

Thurs 5 Jan

A1 & A2 (Porter & Paul)

Bring 2 short poems to class to translate

 

WEEK 2

 Tues 10 Jan

 

 

 A3 & A4 (Bly & Benjamin)

 

 

Translation P1, by 7 pm

Thurs 12 Jan

 

Critique P1

 

 

WEEK 3

Tues 17 Jan

 

A5 (Lorca/Bly and Belitt)

Visitor: Gabriella Page-Fort

 

Translation P2

Thurs 19 Jan

 

Critique P2

 

 

WEEK 4

Tues 24 Jan

 

 

A6 (Geist)

Visitor: Tony Geist

 

 

Translation P3

Thurs 26 Jan

Critique P3

 

WEEK 5

Tues 31 Jan

 

A7 (Call)

Visitor: Wendy Call

 

Translation P4

Thurs 2 Feb

Critique P4

 

WEEK 6

Tues 7 Feb

 

Eco, Intro & Ch. I-IV

Presentation One

Translation F1

Thurs 9 Feb

Critique F1

 

WEEK 7

Tues 14 Feb

 

Eco, Ch. V-VIII

Presentation Two

 

Translation F2

Thurs 16 Feb

Critique F2

Presentation Three

 

WEEK 8

Tues 21 Feb

 

A8 (Walkowitz)

Presentation Four

 

Translation F3

Thurs 23 Feb

 

Critique F3

Presentation Five

 

WEEK 9

Tues 28 Feb

 

A9 (Mayo) & A10 (Apter)

 

Translation F4

Thurs 2 March

Critique F4

 

WEEK 10

Tues 7 March

Reading of Translations Part 1

Final Portfolio Due

Thurs 9 March

 Reading of Translations Part 2

 

 

Online Dictionaries:

Please identify several good bilingual dictionaries that you can use for your translations and monolingual dictionaries that you can use for consulting your Source Language, for instance,

http://www.linguee.com/

http://www.reverso.net/text_translation.aspx?lang=EN

http://dle.rae.es/

http://www.academia.org.mx/DiccionarioDeMexicanismos

CLASS ATTENDANCE AND PREPARATION

Please prioritize attending all class meetings unless you are too sick to do so. Please schedule any doctor or advising appointments, etc., accordingly. Please turn in each of your eight translation assignments by the due date and come to class prepared by having read the assigned readings and completed a critique of other students’ translations in advance.

ORAL PRESENTATION

You will work in pairs to prepare an oral presentation on either (a) the contributions to the field by one major literary translator or theoretician or b) a recent major book on theory and practice of literary translation. Please prepare to speak for 20-30 minutes and to take questions for another 10-20 minutes.

TRANSLATION EXERCISES:

You will each be translating a total of approximately four to six double-spaced pages of poetry and eight to ten double-spaced pages of fiction, following the following scheme:

Poetry 1 (P1): first draft, first half of a poetry selection (two to three double-spaced pages)

Poetry 2 (P2) : second draft, first half of a poetry selection

Poetry 3 (P3): first draft, second half of a poetry selection (two to three double-spaced pages)

Poetry 4 (P4): final draft of your poetry selection and critical translator’s introduction

 

Fiction 1 (F1): first draft, first half of a short story (four to five double-spaced pages)

Fiction 2 (F2): second draft, first half of a short story

Fiction 3 (F3): first draft, second half of a short story (four to five double-spaced pages)

Fiction 4 (F4): final draft of your fiction selection and critical translator’s introduction

By each Sunday at midnight you will upload your draft to be critiqued in class on Thursday to our Canvas site. By Wednesday at 5 pm you will critique three other students’ translations online and bring a hard copy of your comments to the seminar on Thursday to discuss with them.

POETRY:

Please select two published poems in your source language that, as nearly as you are able to determine, has never been published in English translation. (You will want to do both a search in the library catalog and a google [or similar] search for possible translations.) Post your original translation of each poem, followed by your revision, taking into account the class' critiques, on our Canvas site.

FICTION:

Please select two published short stories in your source language that, as nearly as you are able to determine, has never been published in English translation. (You will want to do both a search in the library catalog and a google [or similar] search for possible translations.) Post your translation of each poem, followed by your revision, taking into account the class' critiques, on our Canvas site.

GRADING:

Each of eight translation assignments, 5% each                                                                                  40%

Final translation portfolio, including your fiction and poetry

translations with translator introductions                              20%

Oral presentation                                                               20%                                                          

Class participation                                                             20%                                                                        

ACADEMIC HONESTY:

Your written work submitted on Canvas will be examined by VeriCite.

You are responsible for understanding and observing the UW guidelines regarding academic honesty:

https://canvas.uw.edu/courses/1036395

It is not acceptable under any circumstances to use a for-pay paper web site as a source of information or to use another person’s translations as your own. Incidents of plagiarism may be reported to the Provost’s Committee on Academic Conduct.  A second incident could result in your suspension from the University. Please let me know if you have any questions about these guidelines or about UW policy on plagiarism.

Students with Disabilities:

To request accommodations due to a disability, please contact Disabled Student Services, 448 Schmitz, (206) 543-8924 ((V/TTY). If you have a letter from Disabled Student Services indicating that you have a disability that requires academic accommodations, please present the letter to me so we can discuss such accommodations.

 

 

 

Additional Details:

C LIT 511A: Literary Translation

A graduate practicum in literary translation. Each student will turn in four sets of fiction translations and four of poetry, to be critiqued by other members of the seminar and then revised. At the end of the quarter, each student will turn in a portfolio of their translations, each finalized and accompanied by a critical translator’s introduction, and a list of journals to which they will submit them for publication. We will also read and discuss a collection of essays by prominent translators on the theory and practice of translation, including questions of translatability, fidelity, and the charged politics of translation. Also, each student will make an oral presentation on the work of a prominent theorist or translator. A prerequisite for this seminar is demonstrable fluency in English plus another language. Required Texts: Umberto Eco, Mouse or Rat? Translation as Negotiation. Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 2013. Kindle Edition, $6. ASIN: B00RTY9FBU; Gill Paul, ed. Translation in Practice. Champaign: Dalkey Archive Press, 2009, PDF posted to Canvas; essays posted to Canvas.

Catalog Description: 
Lectures on principles of translating literary works into readable English. Students present and comment on translations made by them and write seminar papers on problems of translation in theory and practice.
Credits: 
5.0
Status: 
Active
Last updated: 
October 17, 2018 - 9:13pm
Share