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C LIT 240 A: Writing In Comparative Literature

Scandinavian Literature

Summer Term: 
A-term
Meeting Time: 
MTWTh 10:20am - 12:30pm
Location: 
CMU 326
SLN: 
10579
Instructor:
Mimi Nielsen

Syllabus Description:

This one month course fulfills the 5-credit English composition (C) requirement, or half of the 10-credit additional writing (W) requirement (w/grade 2.0+)

  

Reading the Liminal: In-Between Places, States, or Conditions.

A novelistic journey through Sweden, Norway, Finland, Denmark, and Iceland.

C LIT 240A, Summer 2016: Writing In Comparative Literature

Class: CMU 326   M/T/W/Th 10:20am-12:30pm

Instructor: Mimi Nielsen Office: PDL 205

Email: miminiel@uw.edu

Office hours: Tuesdays 9-10am/1-2pm or by appointment.

In this class we will read two novels and excerpts from two additional novels, from as many countries—all published 1997 or later. We will also watch two films—one Norwegian and one Swedish. These books and films all touch on liminal states, states of transition or unknowability; written in the styles of magical realism to family dramas and suspense. We will consider how the authors pull in their readers by grounding their narratives in the everyday, to then explore meaning that transcends the immediate and the ordinary, thereby launching readerly imaginations far afield. Come prepared to read and discuss the writings of John Ajvide Lindqvist, Erlend Loe, Riikka Pulkkinen, Yrsa Sigurðardóttir, and the writing team Lene Kaaberbol and Agnete Friis. As we consider the styles and themes, as well as the differences and similarities of these novels, we will also work on developing critical thinking and academic writing skills.

Texts and Materials:

Lene Kaaberbøl & Agnete Friis. The Boy in the Suitcase/Drengen i kufferten (2011/2008)

Rikka Pulkkinnen. True/Totta (2010/2012)

Majgull Axelsson. April Witch/Aprilhäxan (1997/2003)

Yrsa Sigurdardóttir. Last Rituals/Þriðja táknið (2007/2005)

Erland Loe. Naïve. Super (2001)

~Any additional texts will be emailed to the class list and/or posted on Canvas. Make sure to update your email address. 

Films:

Reprise (2006) Norwegian

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/05/16/movies/16repr.html?_r=0

As It Is In Heaven (2004) Swedish

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/11/movies/as-it-is-in-heaven-a-first-feature-by-joshua-overbay.html

Links :

Scan Guilt: http://www.hf.uio.no/english/research/theme/scandinavian-narratives-of-guilt-and-privilege/

The Boy in the Suitcase--Blog article.

http://detectivesbeyondborders.blogspot.com/2011/08/more-on-boy-in-suitcase.html

Outside Resource: The Writing Center at the Odegaard Library

Attendance and Participation:

Regular and timely participation is required, as is bringing two written (printed—not handwritten) questions or comments pertaining to our day’s readings/viewings to each class session. We will discuss your questions and comments either as a class or in small groups. Your hard copies will be handed in at the end of class. 

One student-instructor conference is required and counts for 5% of your participation grade. That said you are always welcome to come to my office hours. I am very happy to meet with you and discuss our texts, your ideas/questions, and/or your writing. If my hours do not jive with your schedule, please email me and we will figure out a time that does. Please bring your portfolio-notebook.  

Writing Assignments:

Over the course of the four-plus weeks of C Lit 240 A you will write three short comparative papers (2-3 pages weeks 1-3), which will be due (uploaded onto Canvas) on Sundays by noon. The short paper with the lowest grade will be dropped. The final paper will be a 5-6 page comparative essay, which will be due by 6 pm the last day of classes—extensions presented in a timely manner may be requested. All papers should be in Times New Roman, font 12, and double-spaced—please include your name. W-credit course requirements stipulate 10-15 pages of graded writing.

Thesis Workshops:

In-class thesis workshop on Thursdays. Final thesis will be due Fridays by noon. 

Accommodations:

Students requesting accommodations for this class are encouraged to make an appointment to see me during my office hours to discuss their needs. You can also contact Disability Resources for Students: 11 Mary Gates Hall; (206) 543-8924; uwdrs@uw.edu

Plagiarism:

Plagiarism, or academic dishonesty, is presenting someone else's ideas or writing as your own. If you use another’s ideas you must cite the source. Any student found to have plagiarized will be reported to the College of Arts and Sciences for review. Please see: http://depts.washington.edu/grading/conduct/honesty.html (Links to an external site.) (Links to an external site.)  

Grading:
Class Participation: 35% (Includes 5% for Week-3-conference with instructor.)
Short Papers (total): 20% (10 points each)
Theses  (total): 10% Requires participation in thesis writing workshops.)
Essay: 35% (50 points)

(Use Writing Center for extra credit: 1 pt short papers/3 pts long essay.) 

 Class Schedule:

Week 1

The Boy in the Suitcase.

Tuesday: Read through pg 61.

Wednesday: Read through pg. 111.

Thursday: Read through pg. 168.

In-class (ongoing): Close readings, comparative analysis, and thesis workshop.

 

Week 2

The Boy in the Suitcase cont.

Monday: Read through pg 265.

Tuesday: Finish The Boy in the Suitcase.

Wednesday: Watch Norwegian filmmaker Joachim Trier’s Reprise (2006).

Thursday: Discuss Reprise.

 

Week 3

True.

Tuesday: 

Wednesday: Read through pg 77.

Thursday: Read through pg 133.

 

Week 4

True cont.

Monday: Read through pg 192.

Tuesday:Read through pg 246.

Wednesday: Read through pg 305.

Thursday: Finish True.

 

Week 5

Watch Så ock på jorden.

Monday: Watch: Så ock på jorden.

Tuesday:  Discuss Så ock på jorden.

Wednesday:  Final thesis workshop, plus course material review discussion. And, Donuts!

Additional Details:

Reading the Liminal—In Between Places, States, or Conditions.

A novelistic journey through Sweden, Norway, Finland, Denmark, and Iceland.

 

In this class we will read excerpts from five different novels, from as many countries—all published 2005 or later. These books touch on liminal states, states of transition or unknowability; written in the styles of magical realism to family dramas and suspense, depicting vampires, boys in suitcases, long-ago lesbian lovers, and ancient Icelandic tales of witch-hunts. We will consider how the authors pull in their readers by grounding their narratives in the everyday, to then explore meaning that transcends the immediate and the ordinary, thereby launching readerly imaginations far afield. Come prepared to read and discuss the writings of John Ajvide Lindqvist, Erlend Loe, Riikka Pulkkinen, Lene Kaaberbol, and Yrsa Sigurðardóttir. As we consider the styles, themes, differences, and similarities of these novels, we will also work on developing academic writing skills.

Catalog Description: 
Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.
GE Requirements Met: 
English Composition (C)
Writing (W)
Status: 
Active
Last updated: 
October 5, 2016 - 9:12pm
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