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C LIT 230 A: Introduction To Folklore Studies

Introduction To Folklore Studies

Summer Term: 
A-term
Meeting Time: 
MTWThF 9:10am - 11:20am
Location: 
CLK 316
SLN: 
10578
Instructor: 
Guntis Smidchens

Syllabus Description:

Scand/CompLit 230: Introduction to Folklore Studies
Summer Quarter 2016, A-term
Class meets Monday thru Friday, 9:10-11:20 am, Clark Hall 316

Instructor: Guntis Smidchens
Office: Raitt Hall 305 V; Office Hours: daily 11:20-12:00 noon, and by appointment
e-mail: guntiss@uw.edu ; Phone: (206) 616-5224

Course Description

Folklore (traditional stories, beliefs, songs, customs, and material culture) is a rich resource for remembering and understanding people and their worldviews. This course will survey genres of folklore: Folktales, legends and folk poetry, as a window into the lives of the people who maintain folk traditions. A variety of theories and methods applied in folklore studies during the past two centuries will be introduced in readings and lectures.

Course Objectives

  • Learn some “classic” folklore examples: variants of folktales, folksongs and legends in Northern Europe and America.
  • Learn some methods of collecting and analyzing folklore, with particular attention to folkloristics in Northern Europe.
  • Do folklore studies: Collect, describe and interpret items of folklore from oral tradition

Grades

  • Daily quizzes about reading assignments 20%
  • Four take-home exam questions, 20%
  • Class discussion (face-to-face and online) 20%
  • Four collection projects and portfolio: 40%

Required Readings

  • Lynne S. McNeill, Folklore Rules: A Fun, Quick, and Useful Introduction to the Field of Academic Folklore Studies. Utah State University Press, 2013 [e-book in the UW Library]
  • Other readings online or uploaded to the class website

Additional Details:

Folklore (traditional stories, beliefs, songs, customs, and material culture) is a rich resource for remembering and understanding people and their worldviews. This course will survey genres of folklore: Folktales, legends and folk poetry, as a window into the lives of the people who maintain folk traditions. A variety of theories and methods applied in folklore studies during the past two centuries will be introduced in readings and lectures.

Course Objectives

  • Learn some “classic” folklore examples: variants of folktales, folksongs and legends in Northern Europe and America.
  • Learn some methods of collecting and analyzing folklore, with particular attention to folkloristics in Northern Europe.
  • Do folklore studies: Collect, describe and interpret items of folklore from oral tradition

Grades

  • Daily quizzes about reading assignments 20%
  • Four take-home exam questions, 20%
  • Class discussion (face-to-face and online) 20%
  • Four collection projects and portfolio: 40%

Required Readings

Catalog Description: 
Comprehensive overview of the field of folkloristics, focusing on verbal genres, customs, belief, and material culture. Particular attention to the issues of community, identity, and ethnicity. Offered: jointly with SCAND 230.
GE Requirements Met: 
Individuals and Societies (I&S)
Visual, Literary, and Performing Arts (VLPA)
Status: 
Active
Last updated: 
October 5, 2016 - 9:02pm
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