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C LIT 397 C: Special Topics In Cinema Studies

Television History

Meeting Time: 
MW 9:30am - 11:20am
Location: 
OUG 141
SLN: 
11832
Instructor:
Stephen Groening

Syllabus Description:

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Office hour

Professor Stephen Groening • groening@uw.edu Padelford B-515 • Office hours: Mondays 12-1pm, and by appointment

Can Zhao, Teaching Assistant • zhaocan@uw.edu Padelford B-202 • Office hours: Wednesday 3:30-5:30

Television has a long history. The word was introduced during the Paris World’s Fair in 1900, and dreams of images and sounds delivered wirelessly to the home from far off places in real time dates back to the 1870s. The invention of television was, in fact, a decades-long process that spanned several continents. In the United States, television became the preeminent mass media form in the 1950s and 1960s, supplementing (and supplanting) the popular domestic device of radio. And yet, questions regarding its utility, value, identity, and cultural influence have continually plagued television.

This course addresses many of these issues, focusing mainly on the history of television in Seattle (although some excursions to other contexts will occur), to examine the history of the technology of television, its institutional formations (networks and channels), its cultural expression (programming), and, of course, viewers themselves.

This is a project-based course: students will engage in original historical research by interviewing television professionals, visiting local television stations (and other television sites in the area), and conducting research in local archives, museums, and libraries.

 

 

Additional Details:

Television has a long history. The word was introduced during the Paris World’s Fair in 1900, and dreams of images and sounds delivered wirelessly to the home from far off places in real time dates back to the 1870s. The invention of television was, in fact, a decades-long process that spanned several continents. In the United States, television became the preeminent mass media form in the 1950s and 1960s, supplementing (and supplanting) the popular domestic device of radio. And yet, questions regarding its utility, value, identity, and cultural influence have continually plagued television.

This course addresses many of these issues, focusing mainly on the history of television in Seattle (although some excursions to other contexts will occur), to examine the history of the technology of television, its institutional formations (networks and channels), its cultural expression
(programming), and, of course, viewers themselves.

This is a project-based course: students will engage in original historical research by interviewing television professionals, visiting local television stations (and other television sites in the area), and conducting research in local archives, museums, and libraries.

Department Requirements Met: 
Cinema Studies Elective
GE Requirements Met: 
Individuals and Societies (I&S)
Visual, Literary, and Performing Arts (VLPA)
Status: 
Active
Last updated: 
October 5, 2016 - 9:12pm
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