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C LIT 252 B: Introduction To Comparative Literature: Genres

Global Noir

Course Flyer: 
Meeting Time: 
MW 1:30pm - 3:20pm
Location: 
MGH 231
SLN: 
11806
Instructor:
Steele photo
Cynthia Steele

Syllabus Description:

 

 leonardo1 copy.jpgMallaheadshot2 copy.jpg

 

DETECTIVE FICTION: GLOBAL NOIR

 

SLN 11806        MW 1:30-3:20         MGH 231

Prof. Cynthia Steele     cynthias@uw.edu

Office: Padelford C-502     MW 3:30-4:20     206-616-4085

T.A. Norma Kaminsky     ninsky@uw.edu

Office: Padelford B-202     MW 12:00-1:00

A century and half after its invention in the U.S. and Europe, crime fiction continues to be among the most popular literary forms in the world; since the 1940s, film noir has held a similar appeal to major writers, filmmakers and audiences. What are the basic types of detective fiction and film, in their classical form (noir) and in their recent reinventions (as neo-noir and World or Global Noir)? In particular, how have these genres evolved in different new cultural contexts, including the Global South? We will address these questions through close readings of a number of both canonical and recent novels, together with some of their more successful film adaptations, beginning with the U.S. and Great Britain and moving on to France and Spain, Latin America and Africa. Students will keep a reading and viewing journal and write two short comparative essays.

Required Texts:

Peter Messent, The Crime Fiction Handbook. Wiley-Blackwell, 2013. Online Access through UW Libraries;

Edgar Allen Poe, “The Murders in the Rue Morgue” (1841), 42 pp; available on Canvas site under "Files";

Arthur Conan Doyle, The Sign of Four (Penguin Classics, 1890), 160 pp. and “The Empty House” (the latter is available on Canvas site under "Files";

Raymond Chandler, The Big Sleep (Vintage Crime/Black Lizard, 1939/1988), 231 pp;

Walter Mosley, Devil in a Blue Dress (Washington Square Press, 1990/2002), 272 pp;

Thierry Jonquet, Mygale (France, 1984) (SF: City Lights, 2003), 120 pp;

Paco Ignacio Taibo II, Some Clouds (Mexico) (Poisoned Pen Press, 2002), 250 pp;

Leonardo Padura Fuentes, Adios Hemingway (Cuba) (Canongate Trade Edition, 2006), 240 pp;

Malla Nunn, Blessed are the Dead (Swaziland/Australia/South Africa) (Atria/Emily Bestler Books, 2012), 336 pp.

Films:

Thom Anderson, Los Angeles Plays Itself (2014)

Jeremy Lovering, Sherlock (2014);

Howard Hawks, The Big Sleep (1946);

Carl Franklin, Devil in a Blue Dress (1995);

Pedro Almodóvar, La piel que habito / The Skin I Live In (2011).

Canvas Site:

https://canvas.uw.edu/courses/1038890

Determination of Grades:

Reading journal, Part One                                                                                        20%

Analytical Essay One, 3-5- pp                                                                                  20%

Analytical Essay Two, 3-5 pp                                                                                    20%

Reading Journal, Part Two                                                                                        20%

Class Participation                                                                                                     20%

Analytical Essay:

Students will write two 3-5-page analytical essays, including a list of works consulted, and incorporating discussion of the films and readings studied in class.

Please follow the guidelines of the MLA Handbook and of Linda Hutcheon and Nancy Kang’s “The English Critical Essay”:

https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/01/

http://www.library.utoronto.ca/utel/language/essay.htm

Please utilize the services of the writing tutors at the Odegaard Writing and Research Center and the resources that they provide. You can make appointments with them online:

https://depts.washington.edu/owrc/signup.php

https://depts.washington.edu/owrc/docs.php

Reserves:

All DVDs of films studied in this class are on 2-hour reserve in the Suzzallo Media Center. I have also asked Odegaard Library to place the textbooks for the course on 2-hour reserve in Odegaard. The Messent book is available online through the UW Libraries Catalog.

Academic Honesty:

You are responsible for understanding and observing the UW guidelines regarding academic honesty. Your written work will be submitted through Canvas, which utilizes Turnitin to detect and provide a detailed report on any instances of plagiarism. Please let me know if you have any questions about this.

Students with Disabilities:

To request accommodations due to a disability, please contact Disabled Student Services, 448 Schmitz, (206) 543-8924 ((V/TTY). If you have a letter from Disabled Student Services indicating that you have a disability that requires academic accommodations, please present the letter to me so we can discuss such accommodations.

 

Calendar

Date

In class

Due today

WEEK 1

Mon 28 March

Introduction

Film: Los Angeles Plays Itself

 

Wed 30 March

Film: Los Angeles Plays Itself

Messent pp. 109-115

Poe, “Murders in the Rue Morgue”

 

WEEK 2

Mon 4 April

Film: Sherlock

Messent pp 3-34 & 116-126

 

Wed 6 April

Doyle, The Sign of Four & “The Empty House”

 

WEEK 3

Mon 11 April

Film: The Big Sleep

Chandler, The Big Sleep Ch. 1-18, pp. 3-115

 

Wed 13 April

Chandler, The Big Sleep Ch. 19-32, pp. 115-231

 

WEEK 4

Mon 18 April

Film: Devil in a Blue Dress

Mosley, Devil in a Blue Dress Ch. 1-11, pp. 1-128

Messent, pp. 96-106

 

Wed 20 April

Mosley, Devil in a Blue Dress Ch. 12-30, pp. 129-260

7 pm: Journal Part One - Canvas

WEEK 5

Mon 25 April

Film: The Skin I Live In

Jonquet, Mygale, pp. 1-72

 

Wed 27 April

Jonquet, Mygale, pp. 73-129

Messent, pp. 50-84

 

WEEK 6

Mon 2 May

Taibo, Some Clouds, Ch. 1-6, pp. 3-79

 

Wed 4 May

Taibo, Ch. 7-13, pp. 80-163

7 pm Essay 1 - Canvas

WEEK 7

Mon 9 May

Padura, Adios, Hemingway, pp. 1-109

 

Wed 11 May

Padura, pp. 110-240

 

WEEK 8

Mon 16 May

Nunn, Blessed are the Dead, Ch. 1-5, pp 1-71

Messent, pp. 85-95

 

Wed 18 May

Nunn, Ch. 6-11, pp. 72-157

 

WEEK 9

Mon 23 May

Nunn, Ch. 12-17 pp. 158-230

 

Wed 25 May

Nunn, Ch. 18-22 & Epilogue, pp. 231-309

7 pm Essay 2 - Canvas

WEEK 10

Mon 30 May

HOLIDAY

 

Wed 1 June

Conclusions

7 pm Journal Part Two - Canvas

 

 

Additional Details:

A century and half after its invention in the U.S. and Europe, crime fiction continues to be among the most popular literary forms in the world; since the 1940s, film noir has held a similar appeal to major writers, filmmakers and audiences. What are the basic types of detective fiction and film, in their classical form (noir) and in their recent reinventions (as neo-noir and World or Global Noir)? In particular, how have these genres evolved in different new cultural contexts, including the Global South? We will address these questions through close readings of a number of both canonical and recent novels, together with some of their more successful film adaptations, beginning with the U.S. and Great Britain and moving on to France and Spain, Latin America and Africa. Students will keep a reading and viewing journal and write two short comparative essays.

Texts: Peter Messent, The Crime Fiction Handbook. Wiley-Blackwell, 2013; Edgar Allen Poe, “The Murders in the Rue Morgue” (1841); Arthur Conan Doyle, The Sign of Four (Penguin Classics, 1890) and “The Empty House”; Raymond Chandler, The Big Sleep (Vintage Crime/Black Lizard, 1939/1988); Walter Mosley, Devil in a Blue Dress (Washington Square Press, 1990/2002); Thierry Jonquet, Mygale (France, 1984) (SF: City Lights, 2003); Paco Ignacio Taibo II, Some Clouds (Mexico) (Poisoned Pen Press, 2002); Leonardo Padura Fuentes, Adios Hemingway (Cuba) (Canongate Trade Edition, 2006); Malla Nunn, Blessed are the Dead (Swaziland/Australia/South Africa) (Atria/Emily Bestler Books, 2012); and Kwei Quartey, Murder at Cape Three Points (Ghana/US) (Soho Crime, 2014). Films:Thom Anderson, Los Angeles Plays Itself (2014); Jeremy Lovering, Sherlock (2014); Howard Hawks, The Big Sleep (1946); Carl Franklin, Devil in a Blue Dress (1995); and Pedro Almodóvar, La piel que habito / The Skin I Live In (2011).

Catalog Description: 
Reading and analyzing literature based upon rotating genres such as sci-fi, detective fiction, romance, love, poetry, and comedy. Draws from world literature.
Department Requirements Met: 
Pre-req to Declare Literature Major
GE Requirements Met: 
Visual, Literary, and Performing Arts (VLPA)
Status: 
Active
Last updated: 
October 5, 2016 - 9:12pm
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