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C LIT 240 G: Writing In Comparative Literature

Worlds Turned Upside Down

Meeting Time: 
TT
Location: 
SMI
SLN: 
11780
Instructor:
Slaven Svetinovic

Syllabus Description:

C LIT 240 G: Writing in Comparative Literature

Worlds Turned Upside Down

Spring 2015

T TH 11:30 – 1:20, SMITH 307

Instructor: Slaven Svetinović

Email: slavens@uw.edu

Office: Padelford B-524 (5th Floor)

Office Hours: Mondays, Wednesdays 2:30 - 3:30 

Course Website: https://canvas.uw.edu/courses/963507/

Course Description:

The goal of C LIT 240 is to hone your individual writing skills while giving you the opportunity to grow as a critical reader. To this end, we will examine an eclectic selection of texts using the theme of upheaval as a starting point for comparison and composition. Thus, our texts feature settings that are drastically transformed and “turned upside down” by various forces, whether supernatural, historical, or social. Among other things, we will explore how literary works address issues of crisis and social change by “defamiliarizing” everyday experience or depicting alternate realities.

In addition to reading and discussing literary texts, we will also work on developing strategies to help you improve your writing. Each class session will feature a composition component in the form of a writing workshop organized around a particular topic, such as constructing a claim, paragraph structure, revision, etc. Since this is a writing-intensive class, be prepared to write every week. The best way to improve your writing is to read widely and critically and to write often.

Course Materials:

The Metamorphosis & Other Stories, by Franz Kafka (Schocken Kafka Library edition)  

The Master & Margarita, by Mikhail Bulgakov (Trans. by Burgin & Tiernan O’Connor)

Never Let Me Go, by Kazuo Ishiguro

(These are available at the UW bookstore under C LIT 240 G)

 Additional readings will be available electronically via Canvas.  

Course Requirements:

Participation:  Attendance, participation in class discussions and peer editing will count toward the participation grade. If you are not able to attend a class, please let me know in advance.

Reading Responses: Every week – except for the weeks when the midterm and final papers are due - you will be required to write a short response (around 250 words; maximum one double-spaced page) to the assigned reading for that week. You may write about any number of topics related to the text such as setting, plot, theme, or about your reading experience more generally – something that particularly struck you, any questions you may have, etc. The only requirement is that you provide specific textual evidence, either by quoting from the text or referring to specific scenes or situations.These responses are meant to help you generate ideas for papers and make you examine the assigned texts more closely. There will be a total of six (6) reading responses.

Essays: You will be required to write two longer papers: a midterm essay (4-5 pages) and a final essay (5-6 pages). You will have a chance to revise both the midterm and final paper before submitting them to be graded. I will send out essay prompts to the course mailing list at least a week in advance; I will also post them on the Canvas course page.

IMPORTANT: All written assignments must be typed, double-spaced, in 12-point font with 1-inch margins. They must also follow MLA guidelines.

Both papers and reading responses have to be submitted in hard copy at the beginning of the class period they are due. If you are not able to attend class when an assignment is due, you may send your work to me by email. Late papers will generally not be accepted. In case of an emergency, please email me and I will try to arrange an extension. Also, please make sure to check your UW email account and the Canvas course page regularly for any announcements or changes to the syllabus.

Method of Evaluation:

Class participation: 20 %

6 Reading Responses: 30 %

Midterm Paper: 20%

Final Paper: 30%

Academic Honesty:

Plagiarism, or academic dishonesty, is presenting someone else's ideas or writing as your own. In your writing for this class, you are encouraged to refer to other people's thoughts and writing--as long as you cite them. As a matter of policy, any student found to have plagiarized any piece of writing in this class will be immediately reported to the College of Arts and Sciences for review. For more information, please see: http://depts.washington.edu/pswrite/plag.html

Writing & Tutoring Resources:

-Odegaard Writing and Research Center provides writing and research assistance from trained writing tutors at all stages of the writing process: http://depts.washington.edu/owrc

-Center for Learning and Undergraduate Enrichment (CLUE) provides writing assistance:

http://depts.washington.edu/aspuw/develop/writing-center

-Purdue Online Writing Lab (OWL) for writing tips and citation guidelines: https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/

COURSE SCHEDULE (subject to change):

 

 

Week 1

 

3/31

Course Overview; Introductions

 

4/2

V. Nabokov “Good Readers and Good Writers”(1948) ; G. Orwell, “Why I Write” (1946)

Week 2

 

4/7

Kafka, The Metamorphosis, Parts 1 & 2

Reading Response #1 Due

 

4/9

Kafka, The Metamorphosis, Part 3; V. Shklovsky, excerpt from “Art as Device.” (please ignore the sections that are crossed out)

 

Week 3

 

4/14

Bulgakov, The Master and Margarita, Chapters 1-7

Reading Response #2 Due

 

4/16

Bulgakov, The Master and Margarita, Chapters 8-13

 

Week 4

 

4/21

Bulgakov, The Master and Margarita, Chapters 14-20

Reading Response #3 Due

 

4/23

Bulgakov, The Master and Margarita, Chapters 21-24

 

Week 5

 

4/28

Bulgakov, The Master and Margarita, Chapters 25 - End

Reading Response #4 Due

 

4/30

E.T.A. Hoffmann, "The Sandman" (1816)

Week 6

 

5/5

Good Bye Lenin! (2003) In-Class Screening

 

5/7

Good Bye Lenin! Discussion

Midterm Paper Rough Draft Due

 

Week 7

 

5/12

Ishiguro, Never Let Me Go, Chapters 1-5

 

5/14

Ishiguro, Never Let Me Go, Chapters 6-9

Revised Draft of Midterm Paper Due

Week 8

 

5/19

Ishiguro, Never Let Me Go, Chapters 10-17

Reading Response #5 Due

 

5/21

Ishiguro, Never Let Me Go, Chapters 18-20

 

Week 9

 

5/26

Ishiguro, Never Let Me Go, Chapters 21-End

J.D Salinger - "The Laughing Man" (1949) 

Two Interviews with Kazuo Ishiguro (the first page was accidentally scanned twice)

Reading Response #6 Due

 

5/28

Never Let Me Go (2010) - Film Screening and Discussion

5/29

Individual Conferences

Week 10

 

6/2

No Class: Individual Conferences 

6/4

Final Paper Rough Draft Due

Course Wrap-Up

 

Revised Draft of Final Paper Due Thursday, 6/11, by 5 p.m. via Catalyst Dropbox. 

 

Additional Details:

The goal of C LIT 240 is to hone your individual writing skills while giving you the opportunity to grow as a critical reader. To this end, we will examine an eclectic selection of texts using the themes of disruption and upheaval as a starting point for comparison and composition. Thus, our texts feature settings that are drastically transformed and “turned upside down” by various forces, whether supernatural, historical, or social. Among other things, we will explore how literary works address issues of crisis and social change by “defamiliarizing” everyday experience or depicting alternate realities.

Students will develop critical reading and writing skills that will enable them to communicate arguments and analyses of literary works in a clear,
effective, and creative manner. Assignments will include reading responses, a series of papers, and peer editing. Grades will also depend on attendance and participation in class discussions.

Reading List:

Franz Kafka, The Metamorphosis & Other Stories (Schocken Kafka Library edition)

Mikhail Bulgakov, The Master and Margarita (Translation by Burgin & Tiernan O’Connor)

Kazuo Ishiguro, Never Let Me Go 

Plus a few short stories and secondary readings. There will also be ascreening of the 2003 film Good Bye Lenin!

 

Catalog Description: 
Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.
GE Requirements Met: 
English Composition (C)
Writing (W)
Status: 
Active
Last updated: 
May 23, 2016 - 9:17am
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