C LIT 240 B: Writing In Comparative Literature

The Art of Money

Summer Term: 
B-term
Meeting Time: 
MTWTh 10:20am - 12:30pm
Location: 
CMU 326
SLN: 
10612
Instructor:
William Arighi

Syllabus Description:

Title: The Art of Money

This section of C LIT 240 will focus on the literary representation of money. Money is often taken for granted, as just a part of everyday life. But when we examine short stories, novels, essays, and movies that contemplate money, it is revealed to be always caught in the impossibility of its own existence. While it is supposed to make day-to-day transactions easier, the abstract qualities of cold, hard cash tend to provoke financial crises and inflationary cycles. Money is both a thing in itself and a means of communication between individuals, and, as a means of communication, is subject to issues of truth and power. The texts used for this course will include short stories, a short novel, essays, a film, and an episode of The Simpsons, which will discuss everything from gold and banking, to art auctions and prostitution. The readings will be drawn from France, Argentina, Korea, Cambodia, Senegal, and the Philippines. Through these readings, in-class discussion, peer-review sessions and writing assignments, we will develop skills in rhetorical analysis, literary analysis, analytic and expository writing, how to write for distinct audiences and comparative literary studies. We might also learn a thing or two about money.

 

 

 

Additional Details:

This section of C LIT 240 will focus on the literary representation of money. Money is often taken for granted, as just a part of everyday life. But when we examine short stories, novels, essays, and movies that contemplate money, it is revealed to be always caught in the impossibility of its own existence. While it is supposed to make day-to-day transactions easier, the abstract qualities of "cold, hard cash" tend to provoke financial crises and inflationary cycles. Money is both a thing in itself and a means of communication between individuals, and, as a means of communication, is subject to issues of truth and power. The readings for this course may include short stories, a short novel, essays, and films that discuss everything from gold and banking, to art auctions and drug law. Through these readings, in-class discussion, presentations and writing assignments, we will develop skills in rhetorical analysis, literary analysis, analytic and expository writing, and comparative literary studies. We might also learn a thing or two about money.

Catalog Description: 
Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.
GE Requirements Met: 
English Composition (C)
Writing (W)
Other Requirements Met: 
Status: 
Active
Last updated: 
April 28, 2016 - 9:20am