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Course Descriptions - Winter 2017

For the most up-to-date information, please consult the UW Time Schedule. Keep in mind that future course listings are tentative and subject to change.

Winter 2017


MW 10:30am - 12:20pm
THO 101 - SLN: 12654
Instructor: Yomi Braester
Department Requirements Met: Pre-req to Declare Cinema Major
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Introduction to authorship in the cinema. The work of a major director or directors. C LIT 270, C LIT 271, C LIT 272 are designed to be taken as a sequence, but may be taken individually.


TTh 11:30am - 1:20pm
OUG 136 - SLN: 12661
Instructor: Stephen Groening
Course Website
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Examines cultural expressions and aesthetic formations across media forms, with an emphasis on electronic and digital media. Media arts analyzed vary, including but not limited to comics, cell-phones, mash-ups, games, electronic literature, video installations, photography, and soundscapes.


TTh 9:30am - 11:20am
DEN 303 - SLN: 12662
Instructor: Sarah Ross
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Covers the vast changes in filmmaking since 1960. Topics include the continuing influence of the French New Wave, the New German Cinema of the 70s and the "New Hollywood" of the 70s, American independent film of the 80s, and the resurgence of Chinese filmmaking since 1980.


TTh 1:30pm - 3:20pm
BAG 154 - SLN: 12663
Instructor: Tamara Cooper
Department Requirements Met: Literature Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Examines the cinema of a particular national, ethnic or cultural group, with films typically shown in the original language with subtitles. Topics reflect themes and trends in the national cinema being studied.


TTh 11:30am - 1:20pm
DEN 159 - SLN: 12664
Instructor: Leigh Mercer
Department Requirements Met: Literature Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

 


MW 11:30am - 1:20pm
PAA A110 - SLN: 12665
Instructor: Sudhir Mahadevan
Department Requirements Met: Literature Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

This course studies popular Indian cinema through a transnational lens. We engage with this cinema's many encounters, influences and travels with cultures and locations beyond India. Bollywood has had tremendous appeal with South Asians residing abroad. It also has a long history of popularity and circulation in the former Soviet Union, Turkey, China, even Nigeria. It has a complex relationship to Hollywood and to U.S pop culture, provoking questions about piracy and globalization. Meanwhile, Indian cinema has also been influenced by Italian neo-realism, the Spaghetti Western, 1980s Disco music, and the radical cinematic manifestos of Latin America. This course will take up a series of examples that crystallize Indian cinema's relation to the cultural universe beyond India and ask: how is Indian cinema, Indian?

Course work for this course will be a combination of quizzes, and short essays based on given prompts and a longer term end paper.  Students will be required to watch at least two movies each week.  Readings will be available on Canvas as pdf files, and where possible, links to movies will be supplied. Students are responsible for watching weekly movies ahead of each week's lecture/discussion sessions.  There is no textbook for this course.


MW 9:30am - 11:20am
SAV 155 - SLN: 12666
Instructor: Shawn Wong
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Students develop collaborative critical and creative skills; studying screenwriting manuals and techniques; adapt stories for screenplays; and/or write synopses, treatments, and first acts of their own screenplays.


TTh 3:30pm - 5:20pm
SIG 134 - SLN: 12667
Instructor: Tamara Cooper
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Elective
GE Requirements Met: I&S, VLPA

Varying topics relating to film in social contexts. Offered by resident or visiting faculty.


TTh 10:30am - 12:20pm
THO 125 - SLN: 11920
Instructor: Gary Handwerk
GE Requirements Met: VLPA, W

Introduces the rich and complex relationship between science and literature from the seventeenth century to the present day. Students examine selected literary, scientific, and philosophical texts, considering ways in which literature and science can be viewed as forms of imaginative activity.


TTh 1:30pm - 3:20pm
PCAR 192 - SLN: 11921
Instructor: Guntis Smidchens
Course Website
GE Requirements Met: I&S, VLPA

Folkloristics combines the methods and ideas of Literature Studies and Anthropology. Folktales (fairy tales), legends, jokes, songs, proverbs, customs and other forms of traditional culture are studied together with the living people and communities who perform and adapt them. Students learn the folklorist's methods of fieldwork (participant observation), ethnography, comparative analysis, and interpretation. Offered: jointly with SCAND 230; AWSpS.


MW
CDH - SLN: 11922 Course Website
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


TT
MEB - SLN: 11923
Instructor: Katherine Morrow
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MWF 10:30am - 12:20pm
MEB 250 - SLN: 11924
Instructor: Qian He
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


TThF 10:30am - 12:20pm
MEB 242 - SLN: 11925
Instructor: Slaven Svetinovic
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


TThF 11:30am - 1:20pm
MEB 243 - SLN: 11939
Instructor: Richard Boyechko
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MWF 1:30pm - 3:20pm
THO 331 - SLN: 11941
Instructor: Douglas Anderson
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MWF 3:30pm - 5:20pm
THO 231 - SLN: 11942
Instructor: Brad Gerhardt
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MTWTh 12:30pm - 1:20pm
THO 125 - SLN: 11943
Instructor: Barbara J Henry
Department Requirements Met: Pre-req to Declare Literature Major
GE Requirements Met: I&S, VLPA

Study of literature in its relation to culture. Focuses on literature as a cultural institution, directly related to the construction of individual identity and the dissemination and critique of values.


MW 1:30pm - 3:20pm
LOW 102 - SLN: 11944
Instructor: Raimonda Modiano
Department Requirements Met: Pre-req to Declare Literature Major
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

This course will introduce students to concepts of gift and sacrifice, two foundational structures of exchange that have ruled economic, social and
religious life since the inception of culture.  Both raise fundamental questions about the constitution of communities by means of the binding
power of gratitude, or, more ominously, about sacrificial scapegoats.  As Mark Osteen wrote, the study of the gift touches on some of the most fundamental concerns that define our humanity: "freedom and autonomy, calculation and spontaneity, gratitude and generosity, risk and power."  The study of sacrifice in turn generates a series of unsettling questions: whether conceptions of the sacred are inextricably linked with violence; whether sacrificial rituals escalate rather than contain violence; whether recuperative economies that seek gain out of loss inevitably fuel sacrificial behavior; whether capital punishment is not in effect a contemporary version of ancient sacrificial rites; and whether communities
can ever escape the predicament of uniting against a designated scapegoat and resorting to sacrificial ideologies.  These and related questions will form the subject of this course which will focus on foundational texts in literature, anthropology, psychoanalysis and sociology and the
representation of gift and sacrifice in the Bible, folklore, literature and film. Texts include Marcel Mauss, The Gift; Sigmund Freud, Totem and TabooRené Girard, Violence and the Sacred; Aeschylus, Agamemnon; William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice and Shirley Jackson, The Lottery.


TTh 12:30pm - 2:20pm
CMU 226 - SLN: 11945
Instructor: Gordana Crnkovic
Department Requirements Met: Literature Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Examination of the development of European literature in a variety of genres and periods. Possible areas of study include literature from romantic fiction of early nineteenth century through great realist classics of second half of the century or from symbolism to expressionism and existentialism.


TTh 2:30pm - 4:20pm
LOW 201 - SLN: 11946
Instructor: Jennifer E. Dubrow
Course Website
Department Requirements Met: Literature Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

This course introduces the modern literature of South Asia (India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, etc.) from the eighteenth century to the present. We will read a selection of short stories, novels, and poetry drawn from the diverse literary traditions of the region. Major readings include The Namesake by Jhumpa Lahiri, Umrao Jan Ada, a novel about a nineteenth-century courtesan, short stories by a variety of authors, and ghazal poetry. All works will be read in English translation. At the end of the course we will have a class musha'irah (poetry recitation), in which students will present their own original English ghazals.


TTh 1:30pm - 3:20pm
DEN 113 - SLN: 11949
Instructor: Naomi Sokoloff
Department Requirements Met: Literature Core
GE Requirements Met: DIV, VLPA

Novels and short stories, from Africa, the Middle East, and South Asia. Discusses relationship of Western literary genres to an oral literary tradition, as well as issues like colonialism, gender relations, narrative technique, native and non-native languages.


TTh 1:30pm - 2:50pm
SIG 227 - SLN: 11950
Instructor: Annegret Oehme
Department Requirements Met: Literature Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Explores topics in literature and cultures of the ancient and medieval worlds across national and regional cultures, such as particular movements, authors, genres, themes, or problems.


TTh 10:30am - 12:20pm
MGH 295 - SLN: 11951 Department Requirements Met: Literature Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Explores topics in literature and cultures of the early modern world (approximately 1400-1800) across national and regional cultures, such as particular movements, authors, genres, themes, or problems.


TTh 3:30pm - 5:20pm
DEN 212 - SLN: 11952
Instructor: Terri DeYoung
Department Requirements Met: Literature Elective
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Offered by visitors or resident faculty. Content varies.


TTh 10:30am - 12:20pm
DEN 259 - SLN: 11954
Instructor: Olga Levaniouk
Department Requirements Met: Literature Elective
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Ancient and medieval epic and heroic poetry of Europe in English: the Iliad, Odyssey, and Aeneid; the Roland or a comparable work from the medieval oral tradition; pre-Greek forerunners, other Greco-Roman literary epics, and later medieval and Renaissance developments and adaptations of the genre. Choice of reading material varies according to instructor's preference. Offered: jointly with CLAS 424.


MW 1:30pm - 3:20pm
PAR 206 - SLN: 22153
Instructor: Habiba Ibrahim

Offerings vary to cover topics such as individual theorists, theoretical movements, or the intersection of literary theory with other disciplines or arts (psychoanalysis, structuralism, ethics, aesthetics).


MW 11:30am - 1:20pm
SMI 309 - SLN: 11959
Instructor: Laura Chrisman

Offerings vary to cover individual theorists and particular manifestations of cultural criticism and ideology critique.


MW 3:30pm - 5:20pm
PAR 306 - SLN: 11960
Instructor: Stephanie Clare

Offerings vary to cover individual theorists and particular manifestations of cultural criticism and ideology critique.


MW 11:30am - 1:20pm
MUS 212 - SLN: 11961
Instructor: William R Streitberger

An examination of the theoretical and methodological issues attending the study of printed texts; training in bibliography and the history of the book from Gutenberg's hand press to the machine and periodical presses of the nineteen and twentieth centuries; and contemporary book art. Offered: jointly with ENGL 503.


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