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Course Descriptions - Autumn 2016

For the most up-to-date information, please consult the UW Time Schedule. Keep in mind that future course listings are tentative and subject to change.

Autumn 2016


TTh 11:30am - 1:20pm
SIG 225 - SLN: 23037
Instructor: Tamara Cooper
Department Requirements Met: Pre-req to Declare Cinema Major
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Introduction to film form, style, and techniques. Examples from silent film and from contemporary film. C LIT 270, C LIT 271, C LIT 272 are designed to be taken as a sequence, but may be taken individually.


TTh 1:30pm - 3:20pm
KNE 110 - SLN: 23039
Instructor: James Tweedie
Department Requirements Met: Pre-req to Declare Cinema Major
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

This course will provide an introduction to classical Hollywood cinema through the work of several key filmmakers, beginning with the golden age of the studio system in the 1930s and 1940s and extending into the early days of "New Hollywood” in the 1960s. Directors will include Frank Capra, Charlie Chaplin, John Ford, Howard Hawks, Alfred Hitchcock, Ida Lupino, Nicholas Ray, Douglas Sirk, Orson Welles, Billy Wilder, and others. In addition to the lives and work of those directors, the course will address topics such as the history of the Hollywood studios, the major genres, the Production Code and censorship, movie technology, the star system, styles of acting, lighting and cinematography, production design and the "look" of Hollywood movies, women filmmakers in the studio era, the position of African-American artists inside and outside the Hollywood system, and the rise of independent cinema in the 1960s.

 


MW 10:30am - 12:20pm
DEM 126 - SLN: 23048
Instructor: Jennifer M. Bean
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Introduction to the analysis of film. Covers major aspects of cinematic form: mise en scene, framing and camera movement, editing, and sound and color. Considers how these elements are organized in traditional cinematic narrative and in alternative approaches.


TTh 1:30pm - 3:20pm
CMU 226 - SLN: 23067
Instructor: Tamara Cooper
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Examines cultural expressions and aesthetic formations across media forms, with an emphasis on electronic and digital media. Media arts analyzed vary, including but not limited to comics, cell-phones, mash-ups, games, electronic literature, video installations, photography, and soundscapes.


MW 12:30pm - 2:20pm
RAI 121 - SLN: 23049
Instructor: Andrew Nestingen
Department Requirements Met: Literature Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Examines the cinema of a particular national, ethnic or cultural group, with films typically shown in the original language with subtitles. Topics reflect themes and trends in the national cinema being studied.


TTh 1:30pm - 3:20pm
MGH 228 - SLN: 23117
Instructor: Cynthia Steele
Department Requirements Met: Literature Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Examines the cinema of a particular national, ethnic or cultural group, with films typically shown in the original language with subtitles. Topics reflect themes and trends in the national cinema being studied.


M
SAV - SLN: 23118
Instructor: Claudio Mazzola
Department Requirements Met: Literature Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Examines the cinema of a particular national, ethnic or cultural group, with films typically shown in the original language with subtitles. Topics reflect themes and trends in the national cinema being studied.


MWF 11:30am - 12:20pm
SMI 304 - SLN: 23076
Instructor: Richard Block
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Elective
GE Requirements Met: I&S, VLPA

Varying topics relating to film in social contexts. Offered by resident or visiting faculty.


TTh 12:30pm - 2:20pm
GWN 201 - SLN: 23077
Instructor: Gordana Crnkovic
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Elective
GE Requirements Met: I&S, VLPA

Varying topics relating to film in social contexts. Offered by resident or visiting faculty.


MW 1:30pm - 3:20pm
SAV 140 - SLN: 23539
Instructor: Jennifer M. Bean

Provides a basic grounding in the theory, history, and criticism of film and media studies, and introduces central debates, topics, and methods in the field.


MWF 1:30pm - 3:20pm
PAR 313 - SLN: 11926
Instructor: Gary Handwerk
GE Requirements Met: C, W

What are we actually doing when we read, write and talk about texts, both literary ones and other kinds? What are authors’ purposes when they put words on a page…and then choose to publish them? What are the texts themselves doing, as objects and as agents in our world? These questions,
central to the craft of writing well, will provide the focus for a course (Comp Lit 240) that is designed to provide you with intensive practice in academic writing and analytical thinking skills. We will be using the methodology of the humanities to address topics that come from the natural sciences: who we are in a world of nature, how we look through scientific lenses.

Course Texts: Pierre Bayard, How to Talk about Books You Haven’t Read; John McPhee, Encounters with the Arch-Druid; Rebecca Skloot (ed.), The Best American Science and Nature Writing: 2015; Barry Lopez, Arctic Dreams.

 


TThF 8:30am - 10:20am
MGH 248 - SLN: 11927
Instructor: Katherine Morrow
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MWF 8:30am - 10:20am
MGH 254 - SLN: 11928
Instructor: Yasaman Naraghi
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MWF 9:30am - 11:20am
OUG 141 - SLN: 11929 Course Website
GE Requirements Met: C, W

When one hears the word “queer,” the most commonly understood meaning involves something negative, a pejorative deviation from the normal. It is also typically used as slang for a white homosexual male. But this class will explore “queer” in its various meanings as a valuable means of questioning what is normal itself.  In addition, it will ask not only how queer looks and expresses itself in relation to race, class, gender, sex and sexuality, but also how it manifests across the many cultures of the Americas.

This course will engage with various forms of queer cultural production (plays, novels, children’s literature, films and slam poetry) from the 20th and 21st centuries across French, English and Spanish linguistic and cultural lines. It will also entertain various feminist, anti-colonial and queer of color theoretical concepts. Students will then develop their analytical skills through writing in various forms (personal journaling, response papers, short literary analyses and a comparative paper).

We will think about and explore not only our own (queer) positions in time and culture, but also of those in the works we read and view. Classes will be a mixture of small groups and class discussions, peer-review workshops as well as activities from Augusto Boal’s Theater of the Oppressed


TThF 9:30am - 11:20am
PAR 313 - SLN: 11930
Instructor: Richard Boyechko
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


TTh 4:30pm - 6:20pm
SAV 156 - SLN: 11931
Instructor: Qian He
Course Website
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MWF 11:30am - 1:20pm
CMU 243 - SLN: 11932
Instructor: Slaven Svetinovic
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MWF 11:30am - 1:20pm
MGH 295 - SLN: 11933
Instructor: Sarah Ross
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


TTh 3:30pm - 5:20pm
DEN 212 - SLN: 23179
Instructor: Brad Gerhardt
Department Requirements Met: Pre-req to Declare Literature Major
GE Requirements Met: I&S, VLPA, W

As common and seemingly universal a word such as “family” seems to be, it has been scrutinized and criticized in literary and cultural studies for its complicity in heteronormativity, patriarchy, racism, capitalism, and more; despite this critique, “family” remains a resilient term for describing intimate human relations. Our intent in C LIT 240 is to examine the deployment of family structures in literature of the 20th century, an era already cautious if not hostile to scenes of domestic bliss, and by this examination of texts themselves to consider whether we can find, as Foucault suggests, “something altogether different,” behind both sentimental and aggressively critical accounts of “family.” We will work through novels and short stories, from J.D. Salinger and William Faulkner on this side of the Atlantic to Virginia Woolf and Joseph Roth on the other, examining the critiques they offer as well as how their interest in narrating the family informs their works. We will specifically examine how their different approaches to thematizing and narrating families interact with contemporary discourse on identity, history, nationality, and time. As a writing course, assignments will center on developing and practicing skills of close reading, commentary, comparative analysis, and research. 


MW 12:30pm - 2:20pm
MGH 231 - SLN: 22954
Instructor: Leroy Searle
Course Website
Department Requirements Met: Pre-req to Declare Literature Major
GE Requirements Met: VLPA, W

Reading and analyzing literature based upon rotating genres such as sci-fi, detective fiction, romance, love, poetry, and comedy. Draws from world literature.


TTh 1:30pm - 3:20pm
CMU 226 - SLN: 11950
Instructor: Tamara Cooper
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA


MW 12:30pm - 2:20pm
RAI 121 - SLN: 11951
Instructor: Andrew Nestingen
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA


TTh 1:30pm - 3:20pm
MGH 228 - SLN: 11952
Instructor: Cynthia Steele
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Suspense films from Chile, Brazil and Argentina, made between 1982 and 2013, exploring conflicts between individual families and the state. Students will keep a film viewing and reading  journal, participate in a group project, and write a short analytical essay.

FILMS:

Chile:Missing (Costa-Gavras, 1982);Machuca (Andrés Wood, 2004); and No (Pablo Larraín, 2012).

Brazil:Four Days in September (Bruno Barreto, 1997); andThe Year My Parents Went on Vacation (Cao Hamburger, 2006).

Argentina: The Official Story (Luis Puenzo, 1985); Chronicle of an Escape (Israel Adrián Caetano, 2006);Kamchatka (Marcelo Piñyero, 2002);Clandestine Childhood (Benjamín Avila, 2011);The Secret in their Eyes (Juan José Campanella, 2009; and Billy Ray, 2015); andThe German Doctor (Lucía Puenzo, 2013).

Reading packet.

 


M
SAV - SLN: 11953
Instructor: Claudio Mazzola
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA


MWF 12:30pm - 1:20pm
SMI 205 - SLN: 11955
Instructor: Ellwood Wiggins
Course Website
Department Requirements Met: Elective for both Literature and Cinema
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Is compassion the foundation of human morality or a dangerously unreliable emotion? This course examines the strategies and motivations in different media of fostering empathy for commonly held enemies or discriminated groups. We examine the ways that casting minorities as objects of pity can strategically forward—but structurally undermine—the project of creating a more open and tolerant society. The syllabus runs from Ancient Greece to depictions of Nazis and terrorists in modern film, and considers philosophical assessments of sympathy alongside examples of its aesthetic manufacture. Half of our readings are in moral philosophy (e.g., Aristotle, Cicero, Seneca, Rousseau, Adam Smith, Kant, Nietzsche, Arendt), and in each case we use the literary text or film (e.g., Aeschylus, Sophocles, Thucydides, Shakespeare, Lessing, Eliot, Brecht) as a kind of experimental field to evaluate the philosophers’ concepts and claims about the moral efficacy of compassion. Students will also work creatively to engender sympathy in four genres (rhetoric, drama, narrative, film).

This course engages in team-based learning. Students will complete four projects that include both creative and analytical components. Groups work to engender sympathy for a “bad guy” in four genres: a speech, a scene, a story, and a visual project. During the final, groups will present their project to the class.

 

 


TTh 10:30am - 12:20pm
DEN 112 - SLN: 11956
Instructor: Leroy Searle
Course Website
Department Requirements Met: Literature Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Explores topics in literature and cultures of the modern world (approximately 1800-present) across national and regional cultures, such as particular movements, authors, genres, themes, or problems.


MWF 11:30am - 12:20pm
SMI 304 - SLN: 11959
Instructor: Richard Block
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Elective
GE Requirements Met: I&S, VLPA

In this course we will look at various theories of tragedy for purposes of distinguishing it from the German mourning play and its depiction of what Walter Benjamin considered the specifically modern predicament of absolute immanence.  In a post-Reformation world in which deeds don’t matter, tragedy is no longer up to the mimetic task prescribed by Aristotle.  Instead, the mourning play, in which the sovereign has no access to an absolute to legitimate his decisions, makes of the hero an anti-hero, of the world a valley of tears.  In that respect, we will also read Benjamin’s Origin of the German Mourning Play as a diagnosis of modernity and its ailments. 

We will begin, however, with Plato’s Ion in which ontology is juxtaposed with the constant becoming that goes nowhere or an  “Iontology.”  We will then interrogate Aristotle’s Poetics, particularly for its understanding of catharsis and mimesis.  What assumptions about the world underlie the Aristotelian notion of tragedy?  After reading Antigone we will jump to Hegel’s reflections on that play and tragedy overall in The Aesthetics: How does Hegel come to think of tragedy as something that has been overcome or rendered obsolete?  Next, we will turn to Nietzsche’s The Birth of Tragedy to understand how Nietzsche rethinks the Greeks to wrest it from the delicacies that framed its appropriation by the German classics. 

More important, we will identify those aspects of Nietzsche’s text that underwrite Benjamin’s Mourning Play.  How does Benjamin refute the ahistorical claims of Nietzsche?  What distinguishes the mourning play from tragedy, the German mourning play from Calderon? To prepare ourselves for Benjamin’s work, we will read  Andreas Gryphius’s Leo Armenius along with Pedro Calderon’s Life is a Dream.  We will conclude the course by questioning what is it that allows for the sudden dialectical reversal at the end of Benjamin’s text.  Has the project succeeded in rupturing the immanence of modernity; has that constellation finally exhausted itself; is it possible now to imagine with Heine a time when capitalism is finally over?

Readings in German (translations of all texts will be available).  Discussion in English.


TTh 12:30pm - 2:20pm
GWN 201 - SLN: 11960
Instructor: Gordana Crnkovic
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Elective
GE Requirements Met: I&S, VLPA

 

The films of Roman Polanski have attracted a world-wide audience and made him one of the most well known and best regarded contemporary directors. His acclaim spans from the early films of the 1950s, such as <Two Men and a Wardrobe> (1958)—directed while he was a student—to 2002’s <The Pianist>, winner of the Academy Award for Best Director, and most recently the controversial <The Ghost Writer> (2010) and claustrophobic <Carnage> (2011).  This course will explore Polanski’s remarkable cosmopolitan oeuvre, which spans more than five decades.  We will focus on Polanski’s most successful films, starting with his experimental Polish shorts, proceeding to his highly acclaimed English production <Repulsion>, then onto such Hollywood classics as <Rosemary’s Baby> and <Chinatown>. We’ll move from there to his post-Hollywood, multinational productions, including such films as <The Tenant> and <Frantic>, his 1990s films <Bitter Moon> and <Death and the Maiden>, and then!   his lauded <The Pianist>, provocative <The Ghost Writer>, hyper-intense <Carnage>, and his newest, <Venus in Fur> (2013). The course will look into how Polanski’s movies adopt a number of different genres and aesthetic approaches to deal with the recurrent themes of solitude, victimization, and the idiosyncratic worldview of an isolated individual.

Offered w/ SLAV 223 A.


M 1:30pm - 4:20pm
THO 335 - SLN: 11968
Instructor: Richard Block

Offerings vary to cover topics such as individual theorists, theoretical movements, or the intersection of literary theory with other disciplines or arts (psychoanalysis, structuralism, ethics, aesthetics).


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