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Course Descriptions - Spring 2015

For the most up-to-date information, please consult the UW Time Schedule. Keep in mind that future course listings are tentative and subject to change.

Spring 2015


MW 9:30am - 11:20am
F 9:30am - 10:20am

MGH - SLN: 11775 GE Requirements Met: C, W

In this course, we will investigate the Western narratives of the ‘discovery’ of unknown countries by reading a selection of travel narrative ranging from medieval times to the end of the 19th century. Our main goal is to examine travel writing as a literary genre and to analyze travel texts for their social, political, religious and cross-cultural implications. In examining narrative choices, writing styles and points of view and reflecting upon the social, religious and political pressures on them, we will gain a greater awareness of the ways in which individual travelers passed on knowledge of the world that they were discovering. Each text will be read in its uniqueness, but also in relation to the other texts as well as with respect to the historical context. We will also reflect upon and analyze a range of issues generated from their retelling of stories, their gathering of information and narrating experiences in order to detect problems of truth, and recognize real facts from fiction in a context where interest and curiosity about distant lands and people brought the idealization-- or the denigration-- of other cultures. 


TT
SMI - SLN: 11776
Instructor: Mimi Nielsen
Course Website
GE Requirements Met: C, W

 

Any situation in which some men prevent others from

engaging in the process of inquiry is one of violence.

                                                             Paulo Freire

Course Description:

Science fiction, fantasy science, and speculative fiction render the familiar unfamiliar and in so doing provide us, as readers, with the opportunity to perceive the world and ourselves in new ways.

In this course we will take advantage of this loosely grouped genre-mix's imaginative scope—in depicting utopic and dystopic societies—to consider portrayals of power and control, and the significance of language and symbols.  We will focus on rhetorics of individuality and collectivity and question how they are used to include or exclude. We will investigate representations of stewardship and ownership and their relationship to destruction and sustainability, as well as ponder instances of despair and euphoria. How do authors convey hope and meaning despite creating scenarios of immense destruction, totalitarianism, and pervasive futility?

We will engage in close readings and both class and small-group discussions to unpack our texts. We will consider these texts cross-culturally. How do the texts reflect different cultural perspectives? To guide our inquiry we will draw on a variety of critical methods, such as eco-criticism, feminism, and post-colonialism. To learn to write well is to learn to think clearly, a process that is greatly helped by engaging with the ideas of other thinkers.

Course Objectives:

The aim of C Lit 240 is to develop critical reading and academic writing skills by acquiring fluency in generating questions and articulating a point of view supported by textual evidence.

Required Texts:

Genesis. Bernard Beckett. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt (2006). ISBN: 978-0-547-22549-4. The UW Bookstore has this book. However, it is also available as an e-text on Amazon.com.

Shikasta: Re, Colonised Planet 5. Doris Lessing. (Vintage International) Paperback (1981). ISBN: 978-0-394-74977-8. Available at the UW Bookstore. 

The Stories of Ibis. Hiroshi Yamamoto. Vi Media. Paperback (2010). ISBN: 13: 978-1421534404. Available at the UW Bookstore. 

Additional Texts: These will be emailed to the class list. Make sure to update your email address and/or link your school email to your personal email.

Films:

Blade Runner (Final Cut, 2007). Available at the Media Center on the third floor of the Suzzallo Library. Must be viewed in the library. Please come with the correct call number: C Lit 240 B. 1.

Dark City (1998). The same availibility as above.

Statutory Warning: Both of these films contain content which may be considered offensive. If this poses a problem, please consider taking another class.

 

MW
MGH - SLN: 11777
Instructor: Yasaman Naraghi
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


TT
MGH - SLN: 11778
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MW
SMI - SLN: 11779
Instructor: Barbara Krystal
Course Website
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


TT
SMI - SLN: 11780
Instructor: Slaven Svetinovic
Course Website
GE Requirements Met: C, W

The goal of C LIT 240 is to hone your individual writing skills while giving you the opportunity to grow as a critical reader. To this end, we will examine an eclectic selection of texts using the themes of disruption and upheaval as a starting point for comparison and composition. Thus, our texts feature settings that are drastically transformed and “turned upside down” by various forces, whether supernatural, historical, or social. Among other things, we will explore how literary works address issues of crisis and social change by “defamiliarizing” everyday experience or depicting alternate realities.

Students will develop critical reading and writing skills that will enable them to communicate arguments and analyses of literary works in a clear,
effective, and creative manner. Assignments will include reading responses, a series of papers, and peer editing. Grades will also depend on attendance and participation in class discussions.

Reading List:

Franz Kafka, The Metamorphosis & Other Stories (Schocken Kafka Library edition)

Mikhail Bulgakov, The Master and Margarita (Translation by Burgin & Tiernan O’Connor)

Kazuo Ishiguro, Never Let Me Go 

Plus a few short stories and secondary readings. There will also be ascreening of the 2003 film Good Bye Lenin!

 


TTh 11:30am - 1:20pm
JHN 111 - SLN: 11781
Instructor: Beatrice Arduini
Course Website
Department Requirements Met: Pre-req to Declare Literature Major
GE Requirements Met: I&S, VLPA

This course is devoted to one of the most fascinating and influential masterpieces of Western literature, Dante Alighieri's Divine Comedy. Dante's poem relates one man's journey from the dark wood of error to the vision of truth, but as readers we not only observe the pilgrim's journey through the afterlife, we participate in it as well, as we encounter questions about the nature of evil, the possibility for
spiritual improvement, and the experience of true happiness, and discover surprising parallels with our own time. Readings of Inferno, Purgatorio and Paradiso seek to situate Dante's work within the intellectual and social context of the late Middle Ages, with special attention to political, philosophical and theological concerns.

Offered w/ ITAL 262A.


MTWTh 1:30pm - 3:20pm
KNE 110 - SLN: 11782
Instructor: Tamara Cooper
Department Requirements Met: Pre-req to Declare Cinema Major
GE Requirements Met: VLPA, W

Introduction to study of film and/or television genre. Literary, mythic, and historic aspects of film and/or television genre. C LIT 270, C LIT 271, C LIT 272 are designed to be taken as a sequence, but may be taken individually.


TTh 10:30am - 12:20pm
MGH 082 - SLN: 11791
Instructor: Jennifer M. Bean
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Examines cultural expressions and aesthetic formations across media forms, with an emphasis on electronic and digital media. Media arts analyzed vary, including but not limited to comics, cell-phones, mash-ups, games, electronic literature, video installations, photography, and soundscapes.


MTWTh 3:30pm - 5:20pm
MGH 234 - SLN: 11792
Instructor: Tamara Cooper
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Introduction to the history and significance of genre in film and/or television. May examine one or a selection of several genres, drawn from a list including, but not limited to, the western, melodrama, musical, thriller, sitcom, film noir, and documentary. Topics include form, ideology, authority, history, innovation, and parody.


TTh 10:30am - 12:20pm
M 3:30pm - 5:20pm

SMI - SLN: 20437
Instructor: Annie Fee
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA


TTh 1:30pm - 3:20pm
DEM 126 - SLN: 11793
Instructor: James Tweedie
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Addresses the latest trends in international filmmaking typically with an emphasis on world cinema and issues of globalization and diaspora. Sometimes taught in conjunction with the Seattle International Film Festival.


TT
SAV - SLN: 11794
Instructor: Leigh Mercer
Course Website
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

This course offers students a basic foundation for studying Spanish cinema. Besides the films themselves, we will study the development of cinematic movements and genres in Spain from the end of the 19th century up until the contemporary era. We will examine auteur cinema, paying particular attention to the productions of Luís Buñuel, Luís García Berlanga, Pedro Almodóvar, Julio Medem, and Icíar Bollaín. At the same time we will focus on learning a critical film vocabulary in order to solidify our ability to analyze cinematography and write critical essays on film. This course should be based on an open exchange of ideas among students, with the goal of establishing a dialogue about the importance of film in the creation of Spanish culture.


MW 1:30pm - 3:20pm
THO 234 - SLN: 11795
Instructor: Mary Childs
Course Website
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Examines the cinema of a particular national, ethnic or cultural group, with films typically shown in the original language with subtitles. Topics reflect themes and trends in the national cinema being studied.


TTh 11:30am - 1:20pm
SMI 211 - SLN: 11796
Instructor: Andrew Nestingen
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Examines the cinema of a particular national, ethnic or cultural group, with films typically shown in the original language with subtitles. Topics reflect themes and trends in the national cinema being studied.


MW 1:30pm - 3:20pm
MGH 287 - SLN: 11797
Instructor: Cynthia Steele
Course Website
Department Requirements Met: Literature Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

w/ JSIS 480

In much of the Americas modernization has been accompanied by rampant abuse of human rights, by kidnappings, tortures and massacres carried out by armies and governments, as well as by networks of organized crime running rampant under weak states. We will examine recent fiction and films focusing on the ‘Dirty Wars’ in Argentina during the 1970s and 1980s, and their legacy today, as well as on the current ‘Drug War’ in Mexico. These works deal with political violence in its various forms, ranging from military repression, torture and disappearance to the violence associated with the rise of the drug cartels, primarily from the point of view of child narrators. We will also examine the role of the United States in these situations of political violence; and the role of various social actors in attempting to bring the perpetrators of these crimes against humanity to justice. Novels: Marcelo Figueras, Kamchatka; Laura Alcoba, The Rabbit House; Eduardo Sacheri, The Secret in their Eyes; Patricio Pron, My Fathers’ Ghost Is Climbing in the Rain; and Cormac McCarthy, The Counselor. Films: Crónica de una fuga / Chronicle of an Escape, Kamchatka, El premio, Infancia clandestina/Clandestine Childhood, La Mirada invisible/The Invisible Eye, The Counselor, and Miss Bala. Students will be responsible for keeping a reading and film viewing journal, writing two short analytical essays and taking three quizzes, in addition to participating actively in our class discussions.


TTh 11:30am - 1:20pm
SMI 115 - SLN: 11798
Instructor: William Arighi
Course Website
Department Requirements Met: Literature Core
GE Requirements Met: DIV, VLPA

The emergence of nationalist thought developed in the nineteenth century alongside new discourses of race and new apparatuses of social control. As social divisions came to be seen as biological and eternal characters of “peoples,” the nation also took shape as the identity of newly ethnicized populations. All of these developments occurred within a world shaped by the European imperial expansion that covered almost the entire globe by the end of the nineteenth century, and which began to deteriorate after the catastrophic wars at the turn of the twentieth (in the Crimea, southern Africa, west and east Asia, and Europe). While many of the questions of political sovereignty that developed within empire became moot after the Second World War and the waves of decolonization that took place across the globe in the 1950s and 1960s, the legacies of empire’s race-thinking and social policing remain embedded in the nation-state. How did these problems come to be linked? In what ways does culture—such as literature and film—shape our thinking about race and policing, and in what ways is it shaped by these developments? What role does policing have in the perpetuation and exacerbation of racial inequalities and race-thought within the nation-state?

 

This course will investigate the development of literary and film culture produced in sub-Saharan Africa, north Africa, Southeast Asia, and the United States of America. The readings and films for this course will focus on how national, racial, and gender identity is articulated with questions of culture, police, and empire from the end of the nineteenth century to the post-World War II world.


TTh 9:30am - 11:20am
MLR 316 - SLN: 11799
Instructor: Míċeál Vaughan
Course Website
Department Requirements Met: Literature Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA, W

This course aims to familiarize you with the development of a story of love and betrayal, involving Troilus and Cressida, which was told by major writers (e.g., Boccaccio, Chaucer, Shakespeare) in the later medieval and early modern periods, against the background of the ancient siege of Troy.

To set the stage for this later story, the course will examine a number of stories involving love and Troy found in important ancient classics, such as Homer’s Iliad, its sequel in Vergil’sAeneid, and selected love letters in Ovid’s Heroides.

We will then look at the evolution of the story of Troilus in medieval writers--e.g., Benoit de Sainte-Maure’s twelfth-century French verse Romance of Troy, and Guido delle Colonne’s Latin prose History of the Destruction of Troy (1287)--that culminates in Giovanni Boccaccio’s Il Filostrato (ca. 1336-68) and its successor, Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseyde (ca. 1385-86).

After reading the Scottish Testament of Cresseid, by Robert Henryson (1475), we will conclude the course with Shakespeare’s 1601-02 play Troilus and Cressida.


TTh 10:30am - 12:20pm
LOW 205 - SLN: 20629
Instructor: Leroy Searle
Course Website
Department Requirements Met: Literature Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA, W

Explores topics in literature and cultures of the modern world (approximately 1800-present) across national and regional cultures, such as particular movements, authors, genres, themes, or problems.


TTh 10:30am - 12:20pm
DEN 306 - SLN: 11800
Instructor: Gary Handwerk
Course Website
Department Requirements Met: Literature Elective
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Comparative Literature 396A (Special Topics); English 365A (Literature and Discourses on the Environment); Environmental Studies 496B (Special Studies): Valuing Nature: Literature and the Environment (Professor Gary Handwerk; Spring 2015)

 Our focus for this course will be upon how literature deals with the environment, i.e., how literary texts represent environmental issues and why it matters that they be represented in this form.  How, that is, does where we live and, even more importantly, how we imagine the place in which we live, affect who we are?  How do our relationships to nature and our relationships with other people intersect? How do we come to value nature, and nature in relation to (or in competition with) human society, in specific ways?  We will be considering a range of prose texts, including fictional narratives, non-fictional essays and journalism, primarily texts written or set in the Americas.  Course goals include: 1) developing the analytical reading skills appropriate to different kinds of literary texts, 2) working on how to formulate and sustain critical arguments in writing, 3) learning how to uncover the supporting logic and stakes of specific attitudes toward the natural world, 4) understanding how environmental issues are linked to other social and cultural concerns, 5) seeing how those linkages are affected by particular historical and political conditions.  The course will contain a significant writing component, both regular informal writing assignments and several medium-length analytical papers; it can count for W-credit.

Texts include Defoe, Robinson Crusoe; Faulkner, Go Down, Moses;McPhee, Encounters with the Archdruid; Abbey, Desert Solitaire; Appleman, Darwin; Butler, Wild Seed; Barry LopezArctic Dreams; and a reading packet.


MW 12:30pm - 2:20pm
SMI 211 - SLN: 11801
Instructor: Galya Diment
Course Website
Department Requirements Met: Literature Elective
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

The course, taught annually, examines the works of Vladimir Nabokov, from his early novels written in Europe to his later
masterpieces, including Lolita, Pnin, Pale Fire, and Ada. By popular demands I will be teaching Nabokov and Joyce this Spring (VN:
Stories, Poetry, The Gift, Lolita; JJ: Dubliners, Poetry, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Ulysses) but the focus will still be more on Nabokov than on Joyce, whose two novels we will not read in full, unlike Nabokov's.

REQUIRED BOOKS (ALL AT UBOOKSTORE):
NABOKOV:

THE GIFT (VINTAGE)
LOLITA (VINTAGE)
THE STORIES OF VLADIMIR NABOKOV (VINTAGE)

VN CRITICISM:

APPROACHES TO READING LOLITA (KUZMANOVICH AND
DIMENT)

JOYCE:

DUBLINERS (VIKINGS)
A PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST AS A YOUNG MAN (VIKINGS)
ULYSSES (VINTAGE)

JJ CRITICISM: T

HE NEW BLOOMSDAY BOOK: A GUIDE THROUGH ULYSSES (HARRY BLAMIRES)

SCHEDULE:
Week 1-2:
Nabokov and Joyce as Short Story Writers and Poets
Nabokov’s Russian Stories
Joyce’s Dubliners
Nabokov’s and Joyce’s Poetry
Week 3-4-5:
Nabokov’s and Joyce’s Portraits of Artists
Nabokov, The Gift
Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
Week 6-7-8-9-10:
Nabokov’s and Joyce’s Banned Masterpieces:
Nabokov’s Lolita
Joyce’s Ulysses


MW
LOW - SLN: 11802
Instructor: Davinder L. Bhowmik
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Elective
GE Requirements Met: I&S, VLPA

Imamura Shohei (1926-2006), a film director inspired by Kurosawa Akira's Rashomon began his film career as an apprentice to Ozu Yasujiro.  The focus of Imamura's films is on the lower strata of Japanese society, the successful depiction of which put him in the forefront of the Japanese New Wave.  This course will consider several of Imamura's well-known films such as Pigs and Battleships, The Profound Desire of the Gods, Vengeance is Mine, Black Rain, and The Ballad of Narayama.

The focus of the course will be on the director of these films, but we will also compare and contract Imamura to fellow dreictors; closely read ibuse Masuji's Black Rain, which is the basis for Imamura's film adaptation; understand the socio-cultural context of the films; and analyze the works using genre-specific terminology.

No knowledge of Japanese is required; all films are subtitled in English. 


MW 10:30am - 12:20pm
* * - SLN: 20451
Instructor: John Vallier
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Elective
GE Requirements Met: I&S, VLPA

Audio and video remixes have emerged as one of today’s most popular modes of expression. From DJ Spooky's "Rebirth of a Nation” to DJ Earworm’s mash-up of the year’s top pop music videos, remixes have the power to convey a multiplicity of meanings. In this class we will explore the discourse and practice of remix culture while tracing its roots back to film collage, plunderphonics, video art, and Jamaican dub. We will ask what messages remixes convey and what cultural critiques they can deliver. This work will be grounded in a parallel exploration of audio, video, and
film archives as sources for our own remixes. In this vein we will critique media archives as sites of privilege and control, while at the same time developing our audio/video/film editing skills and grasp of copyright law. Ultimately we aim to create archival remixes that can be engaging on both visceral and scholarly levels. Student remix projects will be archived in the UW Libraries’ permanent collections.


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