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Course Descriptions - Autumn 2015

For the most up-to-date information, please consult the UW Time Schedule. Keep in mind that future course listings are tentative and subject to change.

Autumn 2015


MTWThF 11:30am - 12:20pm
KNE 110 - SLN: 11842
Instructor: Guntis I. Smidchens
Course Website
GE Requirements Met: I&S, VLPA

Comprehensive overview of the field of folkloristics, focusing on verbal genres, customs, belief, and material culture. Particular attention to the issues of community, identity, and ethnicity. Offered: jointly with SCAND 230.


MWF 8:30am - 10:20am
THO 331 - SLN: 11843
Instructor: Yasaman Naraghi
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MWF 8:30am - 10:20am
CMU 243 - SLN: 11844
Instructor: Richard Boyechko
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MWF 12:30pm - 2:20pm
SIG 226 - SLN: 11845
Instructor: Carolina Toscano
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


TT
MGH - SLN: 11846
Instructor: Brad Gerhardt
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


TThF 11:30am - 1:20pm
CMU 326 - SLN: 11847
Instructor: Mimi Nielsen
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MWF 12:30pm - 2:20pm
THO 335 - SLN: 11848
Instructor: Andrea Delgado
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MW 3:00pm - 4:50pm
F 3:00pm - 5:20pm

JHN - SLN: 22786
Instructor: Paul Morton
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MW
GWN - SLN: 11854
Instructor: Eric Ames
Department Requirements Met: Pre-req to Declare Cinema Major
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Acts of violence and mysterious motives have fascinated cinema audiences for more than a century. This introduction-to-film course gives you a set of tools for investigating and writing about the cinema. Directors to be discussed include such notables as Fritz Lang, Carl Dreyer, Errol Morris,
Billy Wilder, and Aki Kaurismäki; films include M, The Passion of Joan of Arc, Double Indemnity, Ghost in the Shell, and The Girl with the Dragon
Tattoo. In English. VLPA


MTWTh 9:30am - 11:20am
JHN 022 - SLN: 11864
Instructor: Tamara Cooper
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Introduction to the analysis of film. Covers major aspects of cinematic form: mise en scene, framing and camera movement, editing, and sound and color. Considers how these elements are organized in traditional cinematic narrative and in alternative approaches.


TTh 11:30am - 1:20pm
JHN 022 - SLN: 11865
Instructor: Tamara Cooper
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Examines cultural expressions and aesthetic formations across media forms, with an emphasis on electronic and digital media. Media arts analyzed vary, including but not limited to comics, cell-phones, mash-ups, games, electronic literature, video installations, photography, and soundscapes.


TTh 1:30pm - 3:20pm
MGH 228 - SLN: 11866
Instructor: Stephen Groening
Course Website
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Television calls into question many long-held ideas regarding aesthetics, ontology, and epistemology; terms normally reserved for philosophy, not the mass media. Additionally, television is emblematic of modern industrial society; pointing to the universalization of the commodity form, the paradoxes of individualism, the administration of culture and the ideological control of capitalism as a global system. Television can also be conceived as mindless, entertaining, and superficial even as it creates communities, national imaginaries and seems to bring the world into our homes. This course will examine some of these contradictions. We will explore what television is, what television does, and how television shapes our fundamental assumptions about space, time, image and sound.


TTh 1:30pm - 3:20pm
DEM 002 - SLN: 11868
Instructor: Cynthia Steele
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Focusing on film as national allegory, we will trace several major genres in Mexican cinema, beginning with the ‘Golden Age’ films of Emilio Fernández (Salón México) and Luis Buñuel (Los Olvidados) and continuing through the recent boom in Mexican cinema, including road films (Y tu mamá también, Rudo y cursi, Sin dejar huella/Without a Trace), those about drug trafficking and urban violence (Amores perros, Traspatio/Backyard, El infierno), and those about changing gender roles in contemporary Mexican society (El laberinto del fauno/Pan’s Labyrinth, Otilia Rauda). On Tuesdays we will watch a film; on Thursdays we will discuss the film and pertinent readings, from our textbook about the history of Mexico and from essays in film analysis posted to our Canvas site. Students will keep a reading and film viewing journal, write two films reviews, take four quizzes, and write a 5-7-page analytical essay. Textbook: Jürgen Buchenau, Mexican Mosaic: A Brief History of Mexico. Wiley-Blackwell, 2012, 164 pp. ISBN-13: 978-0882952635

Offered w/ JSIS 480A


T 2:30pm - 4:20pm
Th 2:30pm - 4:50pm

GWN - SLN: 22612
Instructor: Claudio Mazzola
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA


TTh 12:30pm - 2:20pm
SIG 134 - SLN: 11873
Instructor: Gordana Crnkovic
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Elective
GE Requirements Met: I&S, VLPA

The films of Roman Polanski have attracted a world-wide audience and made him one of the most well known and best regarded contemporary directors. His acclaim spans from the early films of the 1950s, such as <Two Men and a Wardrobe> (1958)—directed while he was a student—to 2002’s <The Pianist>, winner of the Academy Award for Best Director, and most recently the controversial <The Ghost Writer> (2010) and claustrophobic <Carnage> (2011).  This course will explore Polanski’s remarkable cosmopolitan oeuvre, which spans more than five decades.  We will focus on Polanski’s most successful films, starting with his experimental Polish shorts, proceeding to his highly acclaimed English production <Repulsion>, then onto such Hollywood classics as <Rosemary’s Baby> and <Chinatown>. We’ll move from there to his post-Hollywood, multinational productions, including such films as <The Tenant> and <Frantic>, his 1990s films <Bitter Moon> and <Death and the Maiden>, and then!   his lauded <The Pianist>, provocative <The Ghost Writer>, hyper-intense <Carnage>, and his newest, <Venus in Fur> (2013). The course will look into how Polanski’s movies adopt a number of different genres and aesthetic approaches to deal with the recurrent themes of solitude, victimization, and the idiosyncratic worldview of an isolated individual.


MW 1:30pm - 3:20pm
MGH 254 - SLN: 11874
Instructor: Shawn Wong
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Elective
GE Requirements Met: I&S, VLPA

This is a screenwriting class, which means that the bulk of the responsibility for the success of this class is based on the writing students produce for the class and their critique of the writing done by your classmates.

The goal of the class is to prepare students for more independent writing and self-critique. The focus on the writing is centered on revision, editing, adaptation of an existing fictional story and understanding the craft of the screenplay.

The course is divided into four major areas: Story, Character, Dialogue and Structure.

 


TTh 10:30am - 12:20pm
SMI 309 - SLN: 22290
Instructor: Jonathan S Tomhave
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Elective
GE Requirements Met: I&S, VLPA

Studies representations of American Indians in American films from 1900 to present. Examines the foundations of American Indian stereotypes and how Hollywood helped create and perpetuate those stereotypes. Activities include reading critical materials, and viewing, discussing, and writing critically about films by non-Native directors.


MW 12:30pm - 2:20pm
MGH 271 - SLN: 11877
Instructor: Leroy Searle
Course Website
Department Requirements Met: Literature Elective
GE Requirements Met: VLPA, W

Examines the links between literature and other disciplines or art forms. Literature and history, literature and philosophy, literature and music, literature and the visual arts are all appropriate topics. Selection of focus depends on instructor.


MW 1:30pm - 3:20pm
THO 215 - SLN: 11883
Instructor: Jennifer M. Bean

Provides a basic grounding in the theory, history, and criticism of film and media studies, and introduces central debates, topics, and methods in the field.


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