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Course Descriptions - Summer 2014

For the most up-to-date information, please consult the UW Time Schedule. Keep in mind that future course listings are tentative and subject to change.

Summer 2014 A-term


MTWTh 10:20am - 12:30pm
EEB 042 - SLN: 10611
Instructor: Xiqing Zheng
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MTWTh 1:10pm - 3:20pm
PCAR 290 - SLN: 10613
Instructor: Sudhir Mahadevan
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Introduction to the analysis of film. Covers major aspects of cinematic form: mise en scene, framing and camera movement, editing, and sound and color. Considers how these elements are organized in traditional cinematic narrative and in alternative approaches.


MTWTh 10:50am - 1:00pm
THO 101 - SLN: 10614
Instructor: Tamara Cooper
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Covers the vast changes in filmmaking since 1960. Topics include the continuing influence of the French New Wave, the New German Cinema of the 70s and the "New Hollywood" of the 70s, American independent film of the 80s, and the resurgence of Chinese filmmaking since 1980.


MTWTh 1:10pm - 3:20pm
SAV 169 - SLN: 10615
Instructor: Cynthia Steele
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Examines the cinema of a particular national, ethnic or cultural group, with films typically shown in the original language with subtitles. Topics reflect themes and trends in the national cinema being studied.


MTThF 2:20pm - 4:30pm
SIG 134 - SLN: 10617
Instructor: Claudio Mazzola
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Examines the cinema of a particular national, ethnic or cultural group, with films typically shown in the original language with subtitles. Topics reflect themes and trends in the national cinema being studied.


MTWTh 9:40am - 11:50am
SMI 205 - SLN: 10619
Instructor: Yasaman Naraghi
Department Requirements Met: Literature Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA, W

In his 1999 Nobel Lecture, Günter Grass remarks, “But the present, which the past is constantly turning into, would catch up to him in the end and put him through the third degree. Because every writer is of his time, no matter how he protests being born too early or late. He does not autonomously choose what he will write about, that choice is made for him. At least I was not free to choose. Left to my own devices, I would have followed the laws of aesthetics and been perfectly happy to seek my place in texts droll and harmless.

 But that was not to be. There were extenuating circumstances: mountains of rubble and cadavers, fruit of the womb of German history.” In line with the words of Grass, this course will examine the works of German writers of post-World War II as they rummaged through the “mountains of rubble and cadavers” in order to create a literary landscape that is at once German while at the same time questions or negates the German ethos that fortified a fascist regime. Furthermore, following the metaphor of rubble, we will read works from the literary movement, Trümmerliteratur (literature from the rubble), which began immediately after World War II with writers such as Heinrich Böll and ended in the early 1950s. We will, then, extend the concept of Trümmerliteratur beyond a fixed literary movement and examine works by writers such as Grass and W.G. Sebald that exhibit conditions and tendencies of a literature from the rubbles without adhering specifically to the movement of Trümmerliteratur.


Summer 2014 B-term


MTWTh 9:10am - 11:10am
MEB 248 - SLN: 10609
Instructor: Brad Gerhardt
GE Requirements Met: VLPA, W

     In the latest BBC version of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes series, Sherlock and Watson are summoned to Buckingham Palace to discuss the problem a certain “licentious” female is causing the royal family. Mycroft, Sherlock’s brother, is about to pour the tea, and asks the idiomatic question, “shall I be mother?” meaning simply “should I pour?,” to which Sherlock responds, “and there is a whole childhood in a
nutshell.” Although his ostensible target is Mycroft—to mock his lack of identifiable masculine traits—the secondary target is certainly the mother. Whatever these “boys” may be, goes the underlying assumption, the mother is to blame; for their genius or for their lack of social development. The mother function expressed by the phrase “shall I be mother?” is one which emphasizes the servility required of “mother” as well as the
performativity  of it; the “mother” is a role, a part in a play, which can be performed by anyone, and which can be evaluated as a performance.

         In this short analysis it should be clear that the question of subjectivity which motherhood troubles is a vital one; from what position can a mother speak? In the creation of “subjects” which motherhood implies, how can a woman retain a subject position when her legal and social status makes her an extension of first her husband, then her child? If “mother” is a role, is there agency involved, and who exercises that
agency, can it be used to resist the role itself? We will examine a different facet of maternal subjectivity each week, reading theoretical texts about maternity alongside plays, novels, short stories, and poetry, using textual analysis and discussion to interrogate the claims and problems of these texts in relation to maternal subjectivity. Our main texts will be Shakespeare’s Winter Tale, Theodor Fontane’s Effi Briest, Virginia Woolf’s To the Lighthouse, and Terry Tempest Williams’ Refuge, along with a course reader with theory readings from Freud, Butler, and Chodorov, as well as short stories and poetry from several other authors.

       The course will be discussion-based and expect students to actively participate; to facilitate this, each student will have the opportunity to begin a session with a short presentation of discussion questions. Students will also be required to write two 4-6 page critical responses to text(s) discussed in class. 


MWF
DEN - SLN: 10610
Instructor: Guntis I. Smidchens
Course Website
GE Requirements Met: I&S, VLPA

Comprehensive overview of the field of folkloristics, focusing on verbal genres, customs, belief, and material culture. Particular attention to the issues of community, identity, and ethnicity. Offered: jointly with SCAND 230.


MTWTh 10:20am - 12:30pm
CMU 326 - SLN: 10612
Instructor: William Arighi
GE Requirements Met: C, W

This section of C LIT 240 will focus on the literary representation of money. Money is often taken for granted, as just a part of everyday life. But when we examine short stories, novels, essays, and movies that contemplate money, it is revealed to be always caught in the impossibility of its own existence. While it is supposed to make day-to-day transactions easier, the abstract qualities of "cold, hard cash" tend to provoke financial crises and inflationary cycles. Money is both a thing in itself and a means of communication between individuals, and, as a means of communication, is subject to issues of truth and power. The readings for this course may include short stories, a short novel, essays, and films that discuss everything from gold and banking, to art auctions and drug law. Through these readings, in-class discussion, presentations and writing assignments, we will develop skills in rhetorical analysis, literary analysis, analytic and expository writing, and comparative literary studies. We might also learn a thing or two about money.


MTWTh 1:10pm - 3:20pm
THO 101 - SLN: 10616
Instructor: Tamara Cooper
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Examines the cinema of a particular national, ethnic or cultural group, with films typically shown in the original language with subtitles. Topics reflect themes and trends in the national cinema being studied.


MTWTh 12:00pm - 2:10pm
THO 119 - SLN: 10618
Instructor: Henry Staten
Department Requirements Met: Literature Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Examination of the development of European literature in a variety of genres and periods. Possible areas of study include literature from romantic fiction of early nineteenth century through great realist classics of second half of the century or from symbolism to expressionism and existentialism.


TT
MEB - SLN: 10620
Instructor: José Alaniz
Course Website
Department Requirements Met: Elective for both Literature and Cinema
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

This course examines the career of Joe Sacco, cartoonist and best-known practitioner of comics journalism (non-fiction graphic reportage). What does it mean to apply the verbal-visual techniques of comics, a traditionally derogated medium, to the serious investigation of current events? How does comics’ cross-discursive hybridity complicate and problematize such journalistic concepts as objectivity, balance and the interview? We will spend some time on Sacco’s early work and his ties to US underground comix before moving on to examine his comics journalism in practice, in such volumes as Palestine, Safe Area Goražde, Footnotes In Gaza and Journalism.


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