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Course Descriptions - Autumn 2014

For the most up-to-date information, please consult the UW Time Schedule. Keep in mind that future course listings are tentative and subject to change.

Autumn 2014


MTWThF 12:30pm - 1:20pm
SAV 260 - SLN: 11821
Instructor: Guntis I. Smidchens
Course Website
GE Requirements Met: I&S, VLPA

Comprehensive overview of the field of folkloristics, focusing on verbal genres, customs, belief, and material culture. Particular attention to the issues of community, identity, and ethnicity. Offered: jointly with SCAND 230.


MW
JHN - SLN: 11822
Instructor: Paul Morton
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MWF 2:30pm - 4:20pm
SAV 138 - SLN: 11823
Instructor: Barbara Krystal
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MWF 1:30pm - 3:20pm
SAV 164 - SLN: 11824
Instructor: Patrick Zambianchi
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


TThF 2:30pm - 4:20pm
THO 101 - SLN: 11825
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MWF 11:30am - 1:20pm
MGH 288 - SLN: 11826
Instructor: Norma Kaminsky
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MWF 12:30pm - 2:20pm
MLR 316 - SLN: 11827
Instructor: Yasaman Naraghi
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MWF 10:30am - 11:20am
RAI 121 - SLN: 11830
Instructor: Richard Block
Department Requirements Met: Pre-req to Declare Literature Major
GE Requirements Met: I&S, VLPA

What does it mean to seek equal status as a citizen when the primary marker of one’s minority status and identity, that of being Jewish, is indicative of a dream to return to Zion? How does one demand of the other, the Jew, that (s)he become German, French or English when the very notion of such nationalisms is vague, uncertain, and forever changing? These are the primary questions that will structure our discussions during the term. We will also be interested in the tragic trajectory that proposed solutions to these problems assumed. In other words, we will seek to understand why for Jews the eventual solution to their predicament as a historical minority in Europe was to abandon dreams of assimilation and argue for the birth of a Jewish state. Conversely, we will examine how religious anti-Semitism led to racial anti-Semitism and finally to genocidal anti-Semitism. That is, how for Germans (and many other Europeans) the solution to the “Jewish problem” became a final one: the extermination of all Jews from the globe.

The course will also pursue a second trajectory, namely, the messianic in Jewish thought. How does the coming of the messiah or the fact that he has not yet arrived affect the disposition Jews assume toward their own lives? How do they read history? How do they conceive of truth when truth is not yet revealed save through ritual law? And finally, what does revolution have to do with the Jewish notion of messianism?

Hannah Arendt insisted that the history of Jewish assimilation in Germany was unlike any other.  Moreover, many contemporary Jewish scholars argue that German and not Yiddish is the language of modern Jewry before 1948.  For this reason, much of the focus of the course will be on German-Jewish relations and questions of diversity.  But since this story overlaps, coincides, and contests the history of modern Jewry throughout Europe, we will also concern ourselves with works that reflect on this history from a broad European perspective, including Honorè de Balzac’s J’accuse, Glückl von Hameln’s Memoirs, and Irène Némirovsky’s The Wine of Solitude.  Other readings include works by Moses Mendelssohn, Heinrich Heine, Sigmund Freud, Franz Kafka, and Hannah Arendt.

 

What students can expect to learn in this class:

--How a religious minority responded to the challenges of modernity;

--How religious Jew hatred became racial anti-Semitism; how racial anti-Semitism led to genocide.

--How the ultimate failure of Jewish assimilation in Germany and Europe forces us to rethink the place of minority cultures in society.


TTh 9:30am - 11:20am
MLR 316 - SLN: 11832
Instructor: Míċeál Vaughan
Course Website
Department Requirements Met: Pre-req to Declare Literature Major
GE Requirements Met: VLPA, W

Reading and analyzing literature based upon rotating genres such as sci-fi, detective fiction, romance, love, poetry, and comedy. Draws from world literature.


MW
KNE - SLN: 11833
Instructor: Eric Ames, Instructor: Andrew Nestingen
Department Requirements Met: Pre-req to Declare Cinema Major
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Acts of violence and mysterious motives have fascinated cinema audiences for more than a century. This introduction-to-film course gives you a set of tools for investigating and writing about the cinema. Directors to be discussed include such notables as Fritz Lang, Carl Dreyer, Billy Wilder, and Aki Kaurismäki; films include M, Minority Report, and The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. Topics covered also include documentary, animation, and experimental cinema. In English. Counts toward VLPA requirement.

Cross listed with: Scand 275 and German 275


MW 1:30pm - 3:20pm
SMI 115 - SLN: 11841
Instructor: Henry Staten
GE Requirements Met: VLPA, W

Provides an introduction to comparative literary study which examines how literary forms and genres shape our reading of texts; how these forms and genres change over time; and how literary forms and genres manifest themselves in different cultural traditions. Includes theoretical readings and substantial writing.


MTWTh 11:30am - 1:20pm
MGH 284 - SLN: 11842
Instructor: Sudhir Mahadevan
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Introduction to the analysis of film. Covers major aspects of cinematic form: mise en scene, framing and camera movement, editing, and sound and color. Considers how these elements are organized in traditional cinematic narrative and in alternative approaches.


MW
SAV - SLN: 11843
Instructor: Jennifer M. Bean
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Overview of the main conceptual problems in film criticism such as: "What is a film?", "What is the relationship between film and reality?", "Does a film have a language?", "What is the connection between image and sound?" Follows a historical timeline within five individual sections.


MTWTh 1:30pm - 3:20pm
SAV 156 - SLN: 11844
Instructor: Stephen Groening
Course Website
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA, W

Introduction to the history and significance of film genres from the early days of film to the present. Examines a selection of several genres, drawn from a list including western, melodrama, musical, thriller, road odyssey, film noir, and documentary. Topics include form, ideology, authority, history, innovation, and parody.


MTWTh 3:30pm - 5:20pm
MGH 287 - SLN: 11845
Instructor: Sudhir Mahadevan
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Film history from the introduction of sound through the late 1950s. Focuses mostly on the golden age of the Hollywood studios and on alternative developments after World War II in Italy (Neo-Realism), France (the New Wave), and Japan.


M
SMI - SLN: 11847
Instructor: Claudio Mazzola
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Examines the cinema of a particular national, ethnic or cultural group, with films typically shown in the original language with subtitles. Topics reflect themes and trends in the national cinema being studied.


TTh 1:30pm - 3:20pm
MGH 251 - SLN: 11848
Instructor: Cynthia Steele
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Examines the cinema of a particular national, ethnic or cultural group, with films typically shown in the original language with subtitles. Topics reflect themes and trends in the national cinema being studied.


TTh 11:30am - 1:20pm
MLR 316 - SLN: 11849
Instructor: Edward Mack
Course Website
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Naruse Mikio (1905-1969), along with Ozu Yasujiro, Kurosawa Akira, and Mizoguchi Kenji, was one of the great directors working in Japanese
cinema, though he is less known in the United States than these peers. Born into straightened circumstances, Naruse remained focused on the
plight of the disadvantaged in modern Japanese society, with a particular concern for the challenges faced by women in a patriarchal society.
Rather than rendering them helpless victims, Naruse created some of the most complex and resilient female characters found in modern Japanese film.

Even as we focus on the director of these films, we will also be examining the performances of the major actors who appeared in them, particularly
Takamine Hideko, Tanaka Kinuyo, and Hara Setsuko, and on one author, Hayashi Fumiko, whose novels became the bases for a number of Naruse's films.  We will begin with the 1931 silent film, "Flunky, Work Hard," and continue through to his final film, "Scattered Clouds" (1967).  No
knowledge of Japanese is required; all films are subtitled in English.


TTh 9:30am - 11:20am
DEN 212 - SLN: 22101
Instructor: Henry Staten
Department Requirements Met: Literature Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Examination of the development of European literature in a variety of genres and periods. Possible areas of study include literature from romantic fiction of early nineteenth century through great realist classics of second half of the century or from symbolism to expressionism and existentialism.


TTh 2:30pm - 4:20pm
MUE 153 - SLN: 11854
Instructor: Gordana Crnkovic
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Elective
GE Requirements Met: I&S, VLPA

The films of Roman Polanski have attracted a world-wide audience and made him one of the most well known and best regarded contemporary directors. His acclaim spans from the early films of the 1950s, such as <Two Men and a Wardrobe> (1958)—directed while he was a student—to 2002’s <The Pianist>, winner of the Academy Award for Best Director, and most recently the controversial <The Ghost Writer> (2010) and claustrophobic <Carnage> (2011).  This course will explore Polanski’s remarkable cosmopolitan oeuvre, which spans more than five decades.  We will focus on Polanski’s most successful films, starting with his experimental Polish shorts, proceeding to his highly acclaimed English production <Repulsion>, then onto such Hollywood classics as <Rosemary’s Baby> and <Chinatown>. We’ll move from there to his post-Hollywood, multinational productions, including such films as <The Tenant> and <Frantic>, his 1990s films <Bitter Moon> and <Death and the Maiden>, and then!   his lauded <The Pianist>, provocative <The Ghost Writer>, hyper-intense <Carnage>, and his newest, <Venus in Fur> (2013). The course will look into how Polanski’s movies adopt a number of different genres and aesthetic approaches to deal with the recurrent themes of solitude, victimization, and the idiosyncratic worldview of an isolated individual.

 


MW
SAV - SLN: 11855
Instructor: Jennifer M. Bean
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Elective
GE Requirements Met: I&S, VLPA

The catastrophic effects of modern culture on our bodies and the environment have become the subject of a 21st century film and media movement ranging from Showtime sponsored television programs to independent filmmakers who take their own bodies as “visible evidence” of environmental and physical crisis. During the first half of the quarter we will scrutinize and assess this late 20th and early 21st century film movement.
During the second half of the course, each member of the class will produce a short documentary film of his/her own. You will be expected to engage in the rigorous research (often archival) practices necessary to interview subjects and prepare a “visual argument,” and you will learn to write a short non-fiction script that will be shot and edited in a fiveweek period.


MTWTh 1:30pm - 3:20pm
SAV 156 - SLN: 23175
Instructor: Stephen Groening
Course Website
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Elective
GE Requirements Met: I&S, VLPA, W

The introduction of visual technologies that record and reproduce two-dimensional moving images is key to a new form of disciplinary power. Through the use of these recording technologies, the practice of surveillance has aided the state in its quest to control its subjects and prevent criminal behavior. Surveillance depends on an indexical relationship between image and reality. Because of this quality, surveillance illuminates and illustrates many theoretical concerns in film, media and television studies. Alongside the widespread use of these technologies, a series of films that represent conspiratorial fantasies of government surveillance emerged in 1970s America.  These films depict surveillance and often rely on those very same devices that enable surveillance. As the recent genre of reality television has reanimated questions of privacy and publicity in the popular consciousness, what were once thought of as pertinent only to government secrets and espionage have become vital social issues which shape the way will we think about the relationship between the individual and society.


TTh 1:30pm - 3:20pm
CMU 218D - SLN: 11865
Instructor: James Tweedie

Provides a basic grounding in the theory, history, and criticism of film and media studies, and introduces central debates, topics, and methods in the field.


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