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Course Descriptions - Winter 2013

For the most up-to-date information, please consult the UW Time Schedule. Keep in mind that future course listings are tentative and subject to change.

Winter 2013


MW 3:30pm - 5:20pm
SAV 138 - SLN: 20754
Instructor: Ileana Marin
GE Requirements Met: VLPA, W

Reading, understanding, and enjoying literature from various countries, in different forms of expression (e.g., dramatic, lyric, narrative, rhetorical) and of representative periods. Emphasis on the comparative study of themes and motifs common to many literatures of the world.


TTh 3:30pm - 4:50pm
MGH 271 - SLN: 20829 GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Introduces the rich and complex relationship between science and literature from the seventeenth century to the present day. Students examine selected literary, scientific, and philosophical texts, considering ways in which literature and science can be viewed as forms of imaginative activity.


MTWThF 9:30am - 10:20am
SAV 138 - SLN: 11707
Instructor: Russell Black
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MTWThF 10:30am - 11:20am
SAV 138 - SLN: 11708
Instructor: Lin Chen
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MW 8:30am - 10:20am
SAV 157 - SLN: 11709
Instructor: Cuauhtemoc Mexica
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


TTh 8:30am - 10:20am
PCAR 395 - SLN: 11710
Instructor: Xiqing Zheng
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


M
SAV - SLN: 11711
Instructor: Amy C. Lanning
GE Requirements Met: C, W

 Ambivalence and Rebellion in the Domestic Sphere Our theme will explore early 20th century representations of the home in literature and, more specifically, women as wives and mothers before the Second World War. In the first half of the course we will analyze "The Yellow Wallpaper" in regard to Charlotte Perkins Gilman's depiction of gender roles and how women responded to and wrote their way out of domestic confinement. Then we will read Kate Chopin's novel The Awakening in order to examine the commodity culture of a time in which "ladies" were forced to embrace traditional values, resulting in a struggle with their own sexuality and sense of worth. In the second half we will examine increasingly modern representations of the evolving role of women by reading select Katherine Mansfield and Hemingway short stories that expose patriarchal culture in an attempt to bring clashing gender priorities to the fore. We will conclude with a cinematic exploration of the negative consequences of extreme self-identification with the domestic function as evidenced in the Hollywood film by director Dorothy Arzner entitled Craig's Wife.


MTWThF 12:30pm - 1:20pm
DEM 012 - SLN: 11717
Instructor: Sima Daad
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MW 3:30pm - 5:20pm
JHN 075 - SLN: 11718
Department Requirements Met: Pre-req to Declare Literature Major
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Surrealism, which emerged in Paris in the early 1920s from the social upheaval of post-WWI Europe and more especially from Dadaism, is arguably the most influential avant-garde movement of the 20th century. It rejected social, moral and logical conventions and sought to revolutionize art, literature, politics and life in the name of freedom, desire and the unconscious. Surrealist art, which was viewed by the surrealists as a means of liberation beyond purely aesthetic considerations, is characterized by a diversity of forms of expression: writing, painting, drawing, photography, film, collage, found objects, sculpture, theater; and of practices: automatic writing, hypnosis, and  somnambulic strolling in the streets of Paris. We will study all these forms of expression and examine the challenges surrealism poses to traditional notions of art, literature and politics.


MTWTh 1:30pm - 3:20pm
KNE 220 - SLN: 11723
Instructor: Yomi Braester
Course Website
Department Requirements Met: Pre-req to Declare Cinema Major
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Introduction to authorship in the cinema. The work of a major director or directors. C LIT 270, C LIT 271, C LIT 272 are designed to be taken as a sequence, but may be taken individually.


MTWTh 9:30am - 11:20am
MGH 287 - SLN: 11732
Instructor: Tamara Cooper
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Overview of the main conceptual problems in film criticism such as: "What is a film?", "What is the relationship between film and reality?", "Does a film have a language?", "What is the connection between image and sound?" Follows a historical timeline within five individual sections.

Queer Theory - is open to AIS, AES, CHID, ENGL, GWSS, DRAMA and C Lit students during Period 1 registration.

Mondays and Wednesdays are lecture days. Tuesdays and Thursdays are screening days for those who chose to see the films on 'the big screen.' All films will be streamed to facilitate working schedules and the possibility of review. Queer Theory considers the discussion of “female” and “male” bodies as visual text from the 1980s to present. What do gender and sexuality mean? What has gender to do with representations of sexuality? When and where do we begin to consider a transitioning body? Students will look at moments of intersection between race/ class/ gender and sexuality as they complicate political agendas and blur binaries between male and female, gay and straight. We will look at the emergence of queer theory as it becomes central to feminist theory and queer cinema as it begins to form its own directions in the context of international independent queer and feminist narrative and documentary film.


MTWTh 3:30pm - 5:20pm
SAV 166 - SLN: 11733
Instructor: Annie Fee
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

The period 1930 to 1960 stretches from the beginnings of film sound to the birth of a new kind of cinema with the emergence of various national “new waves.” These thirty years were scarred by political and social upheaval including the Great Depression, World War Two and anxieties fueled by the Cold War. We will learn how to frame the films within their historical context, demonstrating how these events manifested themselves on the screen. With Europe in turmoil, directors fled across the Atlantic to recreate themselves in Hollywood, bringing with them new styles and techniques. Taking the representative works of these three decades we will trace formal, thematic and  generic patterns across geographical borders, as we follow the various cultural transfers that occurred during this period of massive  unrest. In doing so we will become familiar with major national film trends of the period including German Expressionism, French poetic realism, the postwar European documentary, Film noir and Italian Neo-realism. Readings, lectures and assignments (including a midterm and final exam) are designed to facilitate your engagement with both primary and secondary critical sources.


MTWTh 11:30am - 1:20pm
SAV 138 - SLN: 11734
Instructor: Sudhir Mahadevan
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Covers the vast changes in filmmaking since 1960. Topics include the continuing influence of the French New Wave, the New German Cinema of the 70s and the "New Hollywood" of the 70s, American independent film of the 80s, and the resurgence of Chinese filmmaking since 1980.


MW
SMI - SLN: 11735
Instructor: Sudhir Mahadevan
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Is Bollywood all there is to Indian cinema? This course is an introduction to Indian cinema, or more appropriately, the many cinemas of India. Spend 10 weeks watching great Indian movie classics and new surprises - violent urban gangster films, morbidly humorous films about youth cyber culture, unlikely Shakespeare adaptations, Paris as an exotic and distant city, inventive new sports comedies, to name just a few themes.

Our introduction will be structured thematically around broad ideas - nationalism and Indian cinema; film and mass media; film and the urban experience; cinema and globalization; film as art practice. Where possible, we will also explore the relation between film and other kinds of mages - popular film posters, lithographed, religious calendar images, photography, traveling slide show exhibitors.

Movies will be in Indian languages and subtitled in English. Titles include: LSD: Love Sex aur Dhoka (Love, Sex and Betrayal, 2010, English/Hindi); Satya (Truth, 1998, Hindi), Pyaasa (Thirst, 1957, Hindi/Urdu), Chennai 600028 (2008, Tamil), An Evening in Paris (1967, Hindi), Pather Panchali (Song of the Little Road, 1957, Bengali), Harishchandrachi Factory (Harishchandra's Factory, 2009, Marathi).

Course work includes one screening and two lecture sessions a week. Readings will be drawn mainly from film studies but will include scholarship from other disciplines such as art history, anthropology, urban theory and sociology.

Grading will draw on short response papers, a longer term-end essay and participation.


TTh 3:30pm - 5:20pm
GWN 201 - SLN: 11736
Instructor: Gordana Crnkovic
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

The large area of Europe customarily lumped together under the name of East Europe is the one marked by vibrant, diverse, unique, and often surprisingly inspiring cinematography. While most university courses on the films of Eastern Europe seem to be theme-based and treat the cinema of this region largely in direct relation to the harsh post-World War II political and historical realities, this course will look at Eastern European cinema for its artistic accomplishments, showcasing and studying some of the most aesthetically distinguished, award-winning, or simply most interesting films: masterpieces of East European cinema.

Our film list will include select films by foremost Polish director Andrzej Wajda, whose work spans the era from the 1950s to today, the 1960s Czech New Wave’s <Loves of a Blond> and <Closely Watched Trains>, films from the award-winning Zagreb School of Animated Film, works from prominent Eastern European women directors such as the Hungarian Marta Meszaros, Czech Vera Chytilova, Polish Agnieszka Holland, and Bosnians Jasmila Žbanić and Aida Begić, as well as more recent films, such as the internationally acclaimed Macedonian-American <Before the Rain>, Romanian <Four Months, Three Weeks, and Two Days>, and Croatian <Witnesses>.

This course will also offer a basic artistic, cultural, and historical background to the films we study. No prerequisites.


TTh 11:30am - 1:20pm
SMI 405 - SLN: 11737
Instructor: Henry Staten
Department Requirements Met: Literature Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Baudelaire, Rilke, T. S. Eliot, Kafka, Woolf, and Camus: these are the modernist authors we will study in this course. Modernist writers explored areas of experience that literature had formerly neglected (extreme or even pathological states of mind, commonplace things and people, sexuality and other corporeal processes, and so forth), and in the course of this exploration they moved away from traditional literary forms, inventing radically new forms (of which the most familiar are free verse and stream of consciousness). Class lectures will emphasize the background of modernism in the decline of Christianity among the European intelligentsia, and the associated “crisis of nihilism” that forms the central object of concern for Nietzsche. We will, however, spend most of our time paying very close attention to the texts. I will expect you to bring the relevant text to class with you, because we will be looking closely at it every day.

The first half of the course will be on poetry, the second half on fiction. I will give you very careful, detailed instruction on “how to read poetry.”

There will be a 2-3 page paper on Baudelaire; a 4-5 page mid-term paper on Rilke and Eliot (40 %); and a final, 4-5 page, paper on modernist fiction (40%). Your entire grade will be based on these three papers.

Poems:
Baudelaire, poems (xerox)
Rilke, poems (xerox)
Eliot, Selected Poems
Fictional works:
Kafka, The Metamorphosis
Woolf, Mrs. Dalloway
Camus, The Stranger


TTh 12:30pm - 2:20pm
CDH 139 - SLN: 11738
Instructor: Gordana Crnkovic
Department Requirements Met: Literature Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Eastern European writers have created a wealth of profound and dazzling literary works in the post-World War II period. This course serves as a basic introduction to Eastern European fiction created during and after the communist era, both in the Eastern European countries themselves and in exile, and gives basic intellectual, cultural and historical background. The course also opens the questions about the literary, intellectual, and cultural production in non-market socialist-era societies with values and world views that were profoundly different from those in the west. Texts will include novels and stories by Polish, Czech, Yugoslav, Hungarian, and Baltic writers. All readings are in English, and no prior specialized knowledge of the area or its literature is required.


MW 1:30pm - 2:20pm
SAV 166 - SLN: 11739
Instructor: Naomi Sokoloff, Instructor: Amal Eqeiq
Course Website
Department Requirements Met: Literature Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

This course examines the role that literature has played in the shaping of Israeli identity and of Palestinian identity. Materials covered include selections of fiction, poetry, essays, film and popular music, all of which provide students an opportunity to consider Palestinian culture and Israeli culture in light of the concept of “emerging national literatures.” The course is team taught by instructors with expertise in Hebrew studies and in Arabic studies.

Topics covered include: memory and collective experience; contested nationalisms; diaspora and homeland as themes and as centers of literary activity; canon formation; relations between highbrow, middlebrow, and popular culture; colonialism/anti-colonialism/post-colonialism; cultures in contact and bilingualism; gender and national literatures.

No prerequisites; no knowledge of Hebrew or Arabic is required.


T F 3:30pm - 5:20pm
SAV 155 - SLN: 20828
Instructor: Yizhong Gu
Department Requirements Met: Elective for both Literature and Cinema
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

The film as an art form, with particular reference to the literary dimension of film and to the interaction of literature with the other artistic media employed in the form. Films are shown as an integral part of the course. Content varies.


TTh 1:30pm - 3:20pm
JHN 111 - SLN: 11743
Instructor: Richard G. Salomon
Department Requirements Met: Literature Elective
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Introduction to ancient and classical Indian literature in its cultural context. Texts in English translation.


TTh 1:30pm - 2:50pm
SMI 115 - SLN: 11746
Instructor: Terri DeYoung
Department Requirements Met: Literature Elective
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Examines development of Arabic literature from its beginnings through the fall of the Abbasid dynasty to the Mongols. Coincides with period when Arabic language and literature were dominant forces in Islamic civilization.


TTh 3:30pm - 5:20pm
DEN 316 - SLN: 11747
Instructor: Terri DeYoung
Department Requirements Met: Literature Elective
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

An examination of the major story cycles of the Thousand and One Nights collection, in its social and historical context.


TTh 10:30am - 12:20pm
MGH 389 - SLN: 11751
Instructor: Tom Colonnese
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Elective
GE Requirements Met: I&S, VLPA

Indians in Cinema explores the develoment of "images of Indians" in mainstream cinema from 1900 to the present. Within the class students view movies such as BROKEN ARROW, DANCES WITH WOLVES, TWILIGHT: NEW MOON, POCAHONTAS, SMOKE SIGNALS, and DANCE ME OUTSIDE and will learn to analyze how the movies have create images false and, recently with Native directors, more accurate.


MW 11:30am - 1:20pm
SAV 157 - SLN: 11752
Instructor: Jennifer M. Bean
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Elective
GE Requirements Met: I&S, VLPA

Overview
The effect of modern culture on the environment and on our bodies is everywhere evident. We have reached an age when human advances in science and industrialism are damaging the planet’s basic life support systems, generating waste that the environment can no longer tolerate. To add injury to insult, the human mind that made such advances possible in the first place turns out to have a mouth through which it is fed. And it is eating garbage.

The paradoxes of the present age have become the subject of a 21st century film and media movement ranging from CNN sponsored television programs on renewable energy, to animated allegories produced by PIXAR, through science-fiction fantasies of future catastrophe and documentary filmmakers who take their own bodies as “visible evidence” of environmental and physical crisis. While this recent representational movement forms a substantial component of this course, any informed conception of cinematic “aesthetics and ethics” in moments of perceived social crisis demands a historical purview. Due to the rhetorical potency of filmmaking as a tool for public education and advocacy, for instance, the form has frequently served as a powerful instrument of rationality, harnessed to the manufacture of social consent in a tradition that reaches back to ethnographic and adventure films of the 1920s and “New Deal-era” propaganda and animated comedies of the 1930s. At the same time, alternative rhetorical and ethical ends that have shaped cinema’s engagement with social concerns in recent years, in some cases by rendering disaster or waste “sublime,” draws from a tradition reaching back through cold war films of the 1950s and the innovations of filmmakers such as Stanley Kubrick and Werner Herzog. We will pay particular attention to films that forcibly demonstrate the unraveling of certainty in the visible field and play with cinematic techniques—editing tempos, camera angles, lighting, framing devices, time-lapse photography, extreme close or long shots, mobile or still cameras, etc.—in order to question conventional models of perception and knowledge.

Class Structure: Formal Sessions and Film Screenings
Given what literary critic William Rueckert termed the First Law of Ecology—“Everything is connected to everything else”—this is a particularly ambitious course. You will learn to employ a set of analytical and critical skills intrinsic to film and media studies that will provide a foundation for our study. But we will also be grappling with an ensemble of interlocking ideas, texts, people, and institutions—a sprawling formation within which environmental discourse historically has attained intellectual, popular and legal status. Approximately 12 films will form our primary focus and another 30 films and media texts will be considered in short clips and excerpts; readings will include work by sociologists, historians, film critics, philosophers, and natural scientists among others. Regular class sessions meet twice a week (M/W). An additional two sessions (T/Th) will be designated for film screenings. You are highly encouraged to attend all regular screenings in the assigned classroom, but in cases of scheduling conflict you may also watch these films on your own in the Media Center on campus (2nd floor, Suzallo Library) where all titles will be on reserve, or via NetFlix, etc, if those services are available to you.

Regular Assignments and Final Project:
In the first half of the quarter assignments include weekly exercises such as go-post responses to materials, film segmentation analyses, and oral presentations on relevant materials. A mid-term exam will be administered in week five. Through these foundational assignments you will develop research skills and the critical tools necessary to mount a final project. For that project, you will have the option of writing a research paper that incorporates film frames from the texts you are studying and analyzing; another option will be to produce a short film (approximately 15-20 minutes maximum) that directly reflects the concerns of the class. In order to accomplish these goals an adventurous and inquisitive spirit, as well as a mind open to opinions and perspectives that might differ from your own is absolutely necessary. No prior filmmaking or film studies experience required.


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