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Course Descriptions - Autumn 2013

For the most up-to-date information, please consult the UW Time Schedule. Keep in mind that future course listings are tentative and subject to change.

Autumn 2013


MTWThF 12:30pm - 1:20pm
SMI 115 - SLN: 11727
Instructor: Lin Chen
GE Requirements Met: VLPA, W

Reading, understanding, and enjoying literature from various countries, in different forms of expression (e.g., dramatic, lyric, narrative, rhetorical) and of representative periods. Emphasis on the comparative study of themes and motifs common to many literatures of the world.


MTWThF 8:30am - 9:20am
THO 231 - SLN: 11729
Instructor: Andrea Schmidt
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MTWThF 9:30am - 10:20am
THO 231 - SLN: 11730
Instructor: Megan Bertelsen
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MTWThF 10:30am - 11:20am
MLR 302A - SLN: 11731
Instructor: Yasaman Naraghi
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MWF 11:30am - 1:20pm
MLR 302A - SLN: 11732
Instructor: Nobuko Yamasaki
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MWF 12:30pm - 2:20pm
MLR 316 - SLN: 11733
Instructor: Cuauhtemoc Mexica
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MW
SMI - SLN: 11734
Instructor: Amy C. Lanning
Course Website
GE Requirements Met: C, W

At a moment when popular culture is obsessed with the psychology of happiness and of the importance of individual choice, our understanding of the impact of family and of social bonds is being highlighted more than ever before. As the sciences discover more about the nature of emotions, intuitions, biases, longings, and predispositions, novel questions are being raised about how we come to find our place in the world of family and of community and, as a result, former ideals about manhood and womanhood are being revised in relation to newly defined kinship roles. This course will draw upon various traditions of world literature as a means to examine the evolving concept of the rapport between kinship, revolt, and sexual transgression regarding both immediate and extended family across the ages. We will read and analyze primary texts that develop characters who define happiness in their own terms, whether or not they are able to generate the social and familial environments that will support and sustain it. The syllabus includes plays, short stories, and novellas by Sophocles, Stefan Zweig, Ernest Hemingway, Katherine Mansfield, Rabindranath Tagore, Alice Monroe, Tillie Olsen, Sherman Alexie, Jhumpa Lahiri, and the film Monsieur Lazhar (2011, dir. Philippe Falardeau). Students will be introduced to relevant secondary writings and will learn to write academic essays on primary texts, as well as on multiple texts that include comparative analysis and the integration of secondary sources.


TTh 3:30pm - 5:20pm
EXED 110 - SLN: 11735
Instructor: Russell Black
Department Requirements Met: Pre-req to Declare Literature Major
GE Requirements Met: I&S, VLPA, W

The means by which text in recent years is generated and consumed has changed. Digital technology has made it possible for published text to be instantly available, documenting even the most commonplace events in microblog narratives which are as quickly and easily generated as they are disposable. Images and sound routinely supplement text, and information is reproduced, or "reblogged," in a multitude of different contexts. We will read works of literature that respond in different ways to new modes of textual production and consumption. We will reconsider the distintions between oral narrative and written literature, fiction and nonfiction, and the distinction between text and non-textual media. We will also reconsider the viability of genre, and the nature of text itself.


MW 3:30pm - 5:20pm
GWN 201 - SLN: 11740
Instructor: Gordana Crnkovic
Department Requirements Met: Pre-req to Declare Cinema Major
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

 The films of Roman Polanski have attracted a world-wide audience and made Polanski himself one of the most well known and best regarded contemporary directors. His acclaim spans from his early experimental films of the 1950s, such as the famous Two Men and a Wardrobe (1958)—directed while he was a second-year-student—to 2002’s The Pianist, winner of the Academy Award for Best Director, and more recently the controversial The Ghost Writer (2010) and claustrophobic Carnage (2011). This course will explore Polanski’s remarkable cosmopolitan oeuvre, which now spans more than five decades. We will focus on Polanski’s most successful films, starting with his experimental Polish shorts, proceeding to his highly acclaimed English production Repulsion, then onto such Hollywood classics as Rosemary’s Baby and Chinatown. We’ll move from there to his post-Hollywood, multi-national > productions, including such films as The Tenant and Frantic, his 1990s films Bitter Moon and Death and the Maiden, and his lauded The Pianist and provocative The Ghost Writer. The course will look into how Polanski’s movies adopt a number of different genres and aesthetic approaches to deal with some of the director’s recurrent themes, such as solitude, victimization, separation from society, and the idiosyncratic worldview of an isolated individual.


MTWTh 12:30pm - 2:20pm
KNE 220 - SLN: 11741
Instructor: Yomi Braester
Course Website
Department Requirements Met: Pre-req to Declare Cinema Major
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Conventions, Institutional History, and Ideology

How did martial arts grow into a popular genre in fiction and film, and how did the genre become a worldwide craze?  How do martial arts movies comment on East Asian and North American cultures?  The course examines the formation of literary and cinematic conventions of martial arts films, the history of their production in countries such as China, Hong Kong and Japan, and their ideological background.  In addition to offering a n introduction to filmic technique and Asian popular media, the coruse dwells on the importance of visual and bodily perception, gender constructions, and intercultural translation.


MW 10:30am - 12:20pm
SMI 305 - SLN: 11752
Instructor: Henry Staten
GE Requirements Met: VLPA, W

Provides an introduction to comparative literary study which examines how literary forms and genres shape our reading of texts; how these forms and genres change over time; and how literary forms and genres manifest themselves in different cultural traditions. Includes theoretical readings and substantial writing.


MTWTh 11:30am - 1:20pm
DEN 304 - SLN: 11753
Instructor: Sudhir Mahadevan
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Introduction to the analysis of film. Covers major aspects of cinematic form: mise en scene, framing and camera movement, editing, and sound and color. Considers how these elements are organized in traditional cinematic narrative and in alternative approaches.


MTWTh 3:30pm - 5:20pm
SAV 166 - SLN: 11754
Instructor: Sudhir Mahadevan
Course Website
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Film history from the introduction of sound through the late 1950s. Focuses mostly on the golden age of the Hollywood studios and on alternative developments after World War II in Italy (Neo-Realism), France (the New Wave), and Japan.


M
MLR - SLN: 11756
Instructor: Claudio Mazzola
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Examines the cinema of a particular national, ethnic or cultural group, with films typically shown in the original language with subtitles. Topics reflect themes and trends in the national cinema being studied.


MW
DEM - SLN: 11757
Instructor: Tamara Cooper
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

French International Cinemas will explore the very designation 'Francophone' (those who call themselves French language speakers) as it relates to French national belonging among populations in and outside France. In this case, we focus particularly on film coming out of the province of Quebec and the West African country Senegal as they relate to works from France. Our main goal is to understand the representations of nation and the influence of French new wave cinema on the formations of two unique film cultures. A fascinating relationship between unlikely nations began to develop through the formation of West African film festival FESPACO and through the intimate relationships among daring pioneering filmmakers. We now understand these men and women were to become the leaders of newly forming film movements in all three spaces, France, Quebec and Senegal. How have questions and crises of belonging been negotiated through in film and visual production in spaces where to be included in French citizenry is as much a matter or race, class, generational heritage or gender as it is about growing up speaking the French language as a first language? Students will watch 2 films per week, in class and streamed online and participate in active lecture and discussion twice per week.


TTh 11:30am - 1:20pm
THO 125 - SLN: 21591
Instructor: Andrew Nestingen
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Examines the cinema of a particular national, ethnic or cultural group, with films typically shown in the original language with subtitles. Topics reflect themes and trends in the national cinema being studied.


TTh 9:00am - 10:20am
THO 101 - SLN: 22561
Instructor: Louisa Mackenzie
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Examines the cinema of a particular national, ethnic or cultural group, with films typically shown in the original language with subtitles. Topics reflect themes and trends in the national cinema being studied.


TTh 9:30am - 11:20am
SMI 307 - SLN: 11758
Department Requirements Met: Literature Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Explores topics in literature and cultures of the modern world (approximately 1800-present) across national and regional cultures, such as particular movements, authors, genres, themes, or problems.


MWF 11:30am - 12:20pm
MLR 301 - SLN: 21623
Instructor: Richard T Gray
Department Requirements Met: Literature Elective
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Offered by visitors or resident faculty. Content varies.


TTh 2:30pm - 4:20pm
SAV 138 - SLN: 11761
Instructor: James Tweedie
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Elective
GE Requirements Met: I&S, VLPA

This course provides an introduction to New Hollywood cinema, with particular emphasis on its origins in the 1960s and development in the 1970s. It will consider both the new economic model that emerged after the decline of the classical studio system and the aesthetic experiments of the period. Key figures covered in the course may include Arthur Penn, Warren Beatty, Mike Nichols, John Cassavetes, Dennis Hopper, Francis Ford Coppola, George Lucas, Robert Altman, Sidney Lumet, Roman Polanski, and Woody Allen, among many other directors, actors, writers, and producers. We will also examine the development of new genres in the period, including the blaxploitation film, the rockumentary, and direct cinema.


MW 1:30pm - 3:20pm
GLD 322 - SLN: 11762
Instructor: Galya Diment
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Elective
GE Requirements Met: I&S, VLPA

Varying topics relating to film in social contexts. Offered by resident or visiting faculty.


MW 12:30pm - 1:50pm
SAV 139 - SLN: 21877
Instructor: Justin Jesty
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Elective
GE Requirements Met: I&S, VLPA

Varying topics relating to film in social contexts. Offered by resident or visiting faculty.


MW 2:30pm - 5:20pm
ART 006 - SLN: 11770
Instructor: Jennifer M. Bean

This course is designed to give graduate students a basic grounding in the theory, history and criticism of cinema and media studies, and introduce them to central debates, topics, and methods in the field. The central objectives of the course include familiarizing class participants with the:

*theories most germane to film and media critics since the early 20th century

*methods and problems of textual analysis and interpretation of films

*representative cannon of films and related media texts from diverse historical periods

*historical and cultural paradigms as they relate to film and media studies (mass culture/modernity/nationalism/etc.)

 

In order to achieve these goals, this seminar meets twice a week. One session each week will be devoted primarily to discussion of theoretical, methodological and historical readings.  The second weekly session will be devoted primarily to screening the “feature” film(s) of the week, although the screening session will often begin with a series of clips or excerpts from an array of films, and these presentations will foster techniques for assessing and teaching film’s many formal and stylistic registers: editing, cinematography, sound, mise-en-scene, etc, in a historical context.  Throughout the quarter, your reading materials will mention films or media products that we do not have the opportunity to watch together.  I encourage you to view as many of these titles on your own as time allows, so as to engage more specifically with the theories under discussion, and to broaden your knowledge of film and media history more generally.

Since another of our overarching goals is to encourage a professional relationship to the field of cinema and media studies, the quarter will end (last week of class) with a "course conference" in which each member will present a 20-minute presentation of their research to that point.  Presentations will be organized into respective panels, and q&a will follow each respective panel.  Participants will then revise and expand their conference paper for the final seminar paper.

 


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