You are here

Course Descriptions - Winter 2012

For the most up-to-date information, please consult the UW Time Schedule. Keep in mind that future course listings are tentative and subject to change.

Winter 2012


MTWThF 9:30am - 10:20am
THO 231 - SLN: 11442
Instructor: Adam Nocek
Course Website
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MTWThF 10:30am - 11:20am
MLR 302A - SLN: 11443
Instructor: Lin Chen
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MWF
SAV - SLN: 11448
Instructor: Elena Deem
Course Website
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MTWThF 12:30pm - 1:20pm
MLR 316 - SLN: 11449 GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MWF
MGH - SLN: 11450
Instructor: Jennifer Myers
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MTWThF 2:30pm - 3:20pm
ARC 160 - SLN: 20219
Instructor: Jennifer Myers
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MW 3:30pm - 5:20pm
GWN 301 - SLN: 11454
Course Website
Department Requirements Met: Pre-req to Declare Literature Major
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Surrealism, which emerged in Paris in the early 1920s from the social upheaval of post-WWI Europe and more especially from Dadaism, is arguably the most influential avant-garde movement of the 20th century. It rejected social, moral and logical conventions and sought to revolutionize art, literature, politics and life in the name of freedom, desire and the unconscious. Surrealist art, which was viewed by the surrealists as a means of liberation beyond purely aesthetic considerations, is characterized by a diversity of forms of expression: writing, painting, drawing, photography, film, collage, found objects, sculpture, theater; and of practices: automatic writing, hypnosis, and somnambulic strolling in the streets of Paris. We will study all these forms of expression and examine the challenges surrealism poses to traditional notions of art, literature and politics.

Readings: André Breton, Manifestoes of Surrealism; Communicating Vessels; Nadja; Louis Aragon, Paris Peasant.


MW
KNE - SLN: 11461
Instructor: Sudhir Mahadevan
Department Requirements Met: Pre-req to Declare Cinema Major
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

W COURSE - NO FILM OR LIT PREREQUISITES!

This introductory course is meant for students with no prior experience with film analysis or who have not taken a film class before. The course has two aims. The first is to teach students the basic skills and vocabulary of film analysis. By the end of the quarter, students should be able to describe a movie (or portions of it) using the vocabulary they learn in this class, and be able to construct an argument about the meaning of the movie.

The second aim is to give students a basic introduction to two important contemporary directors, David Cronenberg and David Lynch, from Canada and the U.S, respectively. We will use the films of these directors to learn the basic tools of film analysis. The two directors work in a variety of genres: horror, science fiction, thrillers and murder mysteries, the road movie, literary adaptations.

Cronenberg has been fascinated by the effects of bodily transformations. Those transformations can be through technological hardware, or contagious diseases, or through scientific research. His movies offer extraordinary images of transformed states of being. David Lynch constructs a surreal cinematic experience that undermines the difference between reality and dream, sometimes with intensity. Both directors can be as unnerving as they can be thoughtprovoking.

Films screened will include the following: Shivers, Rabid, Wild at Heart, Lost Highway, Mulholland Drive, The Fly, History of Violence, Eastern Promises. Films will also be available in streaming format online for students talking the class.

Course work: 2 screening sessions and 2 lectures per week; quiz sections; course pack of short readings, and film
analysis textbook.

Screening sessions will only last as long as the duration of the movie being screened. Lecture sessions will be about
80 minutes long.

Assignments - short 1 page response papers, analytical essay, plus quizzes


MTWTh 9:30am - 11:20am
MGH 287 - SLN: 11472
Instructor: Tamara Cooper
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Covers the vast changes in filmmaking since 1960. Topics include the continuing influence of the French New Wave, the New German Cinema of the 70s and the "New Hollywood" of the 70s, American independent film of the 80s, and the resurgence of Chinese filmmaking since 1980.


TTh 1:30pm - 3:20pm
JHN 175 - SLN: 20011
Instructor: Andrew Nestingen
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

CLIT 315 is taught with SCAND 360. The course surveys the cinema of four Nordic countries: Denmark, Finland, Norway, Sweden. The course examines silent cinema, studio productions, the art film, as well as contemporary cinema through the films of the region's best-known filmmakers, including Victor Sjöström, Carl Th. Dreyer, Ingmar Bergman, Lars von Trier, Aki Kaurismäki, and others. One film will be screened each week followed by lecture and discussion during the second class meeting.


MW 1:30pm - 3:20pm
SMI 105 - SLN: 11473
Instructor: Richard Henry Watts
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

We will interpret films that stage, first, the imperial relation between France and its colonies and, second, the contemporary post/colonial condition in the francophone world (in the former colonies as well as in France and Belgium) using three principal modes of analysis: narrative, with a view to understanding the evolution of the political and cultural relationships between France and the colonies and postcolonies as the films thematize them; aesthetic, to identity the filmic technique or language (mise-en-scène, editing, soundtrack, etc.) used to convey the particularities of those relationships; and paratextual, to see how the production of the film (source of financing) and the context in which the film appears (channels of distribution) might influence its creation and reception. We will engage a wide range of film criticism and study films from or representing sub-Saharan Africa (Senegal, Republic of Congo), the Maghreb (Algeria), the Caribbean (Martinique), North America (Quebec), Southeast Asia (Vietnam), and Western Europe (France, Belgium, Italy).


TTh 3:30pm - 5:20pm
THO 234 - SLN: 11474
Instructor: Cynthia Steele
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

This class will provide an overview of the history of Mexican cinema, beginning with the influence of Soviet director Sergei Eisenstein and Russian immigrant director Arcady Boytler in the early 1930s, through the films of the Mexican Revolution of the mid 1930s, exemplified by Fernando de Fuentes; to the culmination of national allegory and melodrama in the Golden Age of the 1940s, epitomized by the works of Emilio El Indio Fernandez. Fernandez窶冱 films, often starring Pedro Armendariz, Maria Feliz and Dolores del Rio, constructed a mythology of revolutionary nationalism linked to essentialized notions of class, gender and race, very unlike the disenchanted view of de Fuentes. Since the 1950s, diverse critical perspectives of national culture have emerged, including the gritty, surrealist urban vision of Luis Bunuel and, in recent decades, the work of various women directors. Readings will be in English; the films will be in Spanish with English subtitles. Students will keep a reading and viewing journal and write two short analytical essays, based on research and original interpretation. If you are enrolled for the Spanish portion of the course, you should write and conduct at least half of your research in Spanish.


MW 2:30pm - 4:20pm
CMU 230 - SLN: 19950
Instructor: Gordana Crnkovic
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Examines the cinema of a particular national, ethnic or cultural group, with films typically shown in the original language with subtitles. Topics reflect themes and trends in the national cinema being studied.


TTh 9:30am - 11:20am
MGH 238 - SLN: 11476
Instructor: Yomi Braester
Course Website
Department Requirements Met: Literature Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA, W

How do texts and films describe cataclysmic and traumatic events? How does the narrator cope with the need to tell and retell painful experiences? How do authors address not only the past but also the present in which they are producing their work? The course examines these questions through novels and films from China, France, Germany, Israel, and Italy.


MW 1:30pm - 3:20pm
THO 135 - SLN: 11477
Instructor: Jane Brown
Department Requirements Met: Literature Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

The seventeenth century was a golden age of drama across Europe, where the stage rapidly came to include lavish visual spectacle and music as well as passionate action and magnificent poetry. Plays of the period were among the most important of public media, a popular and influential forum of political representation by both church and state. This course will explore examples from England, Spain, France, Italy, Holland, and Germany. We will take account not only of the drama‟s poetic form, but also of the aesthetic and social contexts from which they emerged, and of performance practice, as we consider works by Shakespeare, Calderon, Corneille, Racine, Vondel, and at least one opera from the period. Assignments will include several short exercises and two papers.


MWF 11:30am - 12:50pm
MEB 248 - SLN: 11478
Instructor: Jennifer E. Dubrow
Course Website
Department Requirements Met: Literature Elective
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

This course will introduce the modern literature of South Asia (India, Pakistan and Bangladesh) from the fifteenth century to the present. We will read closely a selection of novels, short stories and poetry focusing on the South Asian diaspora; gender; Independence and Partition; religious devotion and morality; and contemporary Pakistan. Classes will focus on analyzing and interpreting the texts as works of literature, with additional discussion of historical background.


MWF 11:30am - 12:20pm
THO 101 - SLN: 11479
Instructor: Richard T Gray
Course Website
Department Requirements Met: Literature Elective
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

This course examines a set of central themes that emerge from Sigmund Freud‟s theories of the dream, the nature of literary creativity, the operation of the human psyche, and the substance of human culture. We will take as our starting point the hypothesis that Freud conceives the psyche as a kind of writing machine, an “author” that produces fictional narratives that share many properties with the prose fiction generated by creative writers. For this reason, our focus throughout the quarter will be restricted to prose narratives. The course will concentrate on literature produced in the wake of Freud‟s theories, that is, on texts that consciously or unconsciously develop Freudian ideas. The class is structured around a set of themes that will be developed on the basis of paired readings: in each case we will examine a text or excerpt from Freud‟s psychological works in conjunction with the reading of a literary text that exemplifies the issue or issues highlighted in Freud‟s theory. Literary works treated include writings by Franz Kafka, Thomas Mann, Arthur Schnitzler, Robert Musil, Ingeborg Bachmann, and others. Course requirements: regular attendance at lecture and discussion sessions; weekly short writing assignments; 2 short interpretive papers.

Book list:
Sigtmund Freud, The Freud Reader
Arthur Schnitzler, Lieutenant Gustl
Franz Kafka, The Metamorphosis and selected short stories
Thomas Mann, Death in Venice
Robert Musil, Young Torless
Ingeborg Bachmann, The Book of Franza

Students who would like more information about the course structure are encouraged to consult the course Web site: http://courses.washington.edu/freudlit


TTh 10:30am - 12:20pm
CDH 109 - SLN: 11484
Instructor: Tom Colonnese
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Elective
GE Requirements Met: I&S, VLPA, W

Indians in Cinema explores the development of "images of Indians" in mainstream cinema from 1900 to the present. Within the class students view movies such as THE SEARCHERS, DANCES WITH WOLVES, POCAHONTAS, THE LAST OF THE MOHICANS, SMOKE SIGNALS, and DANCE ME OUTSIDE and will learn to analyze how the movies have create images false and, recently with Native directors, more accurate.


Share