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Course Descriptions - Spring 2011

For the most up-to-date information, please consult the UW Time Schedule. Keep in mind that future course listings are tentative and subject to change.

Spring 2011


MTWThF 9:30am - 10:20am
SMI 405 - SLN: 11515
Instructor: Russell Black
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MWF
DEN - SLN: 11516
Instructor: Amal Eqeiq
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MTWThF 11:30am - 12:20pm
LOW 217 - SLN: 11517
Instructor: Patrick Zambianchi
Course Website
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MTWThF 12:30pm - 1:20pm
DEN 310 - SLN: 11518
Instructor: Nancy White
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


MTWThF 1:30pm - 2:20pm
THO 234 - SLN: 11519
Instructor: Petia Parpoulova
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


T
SWS - SLN: 19474
Instructor: Cuauhtemoc Mexica
GE Requirements Met: C, W

Comparative approach to literature and a workshop in writing comparative papers in English. Emphasis on cross-cultural comparison of literary works. Readings in English with an option to read selected texts in the original languages Offered: AWSp.


TTh 9:30am - 11:20am
MLR 301 - SLN: 11521
Instructor: Jennifer E. Dubrow
Course Website
Department Requirements Met: Pre-req to Declare Literature Major
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

What separates the man from the monster, the dutiful daughter from the public revolutionary, or the rebellious lover from the obedient citizen? This course explores these questions and more. The course examines the search for self in works of literature from ancient Greece (Antigone), ancient and modern India (Sakuntala), nineteenth-century England (Frankenstein), and America. The readings all highlight the acts of rebellious individuals against established social expectations, gender roles, and/or political and cultural norms. We will ask throughout the course how identities are made, and how the process of self-formation is explored by works of literature and some films.

The course is designed as an introduction to comparative literature. No prior knowledge is assumed. The course will be divided into four units, each focused on a contrasting pair of readings and a particular genre (short story, novel, drama, poem).

The major texts for this course are:
Mary Shelley, Frankenstein
Sophocles, Antigone
Kalidasa, Sakuntala
Various short stories and poems available through online reserves.


MTWTh 5:30pm - 7:20pm
BAG 131 - SLN: 11526
Instructor: Tamara Cooper
Department Requirements Met: Pre-req to Declare Cinema Major
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Introduction to film form, style, and techniques. Examples from silent film and from contemporary film. C LIT 270, C LIT 271, C LIT 272 are designed to be taken as a sequence, but may be taken individually.


MTTh 3:30pm - 5:20pm
THO 101 - SLN: 11537
Instructor: Tamara Cooper
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Introduction to the history and significance of film genres from the early days of film to the present. Examines a selection of several genres, drawn from a list including western, melodrama, musical, thriller, road odyssey, film noir, and documentary. Topics include form, ideology, authority, history, innovation, and parody.


MTWTh 2:30pm - 4:20pm
EEB 003 - SLN: 11538
Instructor: Jennifer M. Bean
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

This course surveys distinctive films and figures in the history of cinema over a period of three decades. The period spans transformations in technology (the advent of sound, color, cinemascope), genres (the musical, screwball comedy, the western, film noir, domestic melodrama), institutions (the consolidation and then the challenges to the Hollywood studio system, the birth of new national cinemas), and trends (German Expressionism, the French New Wave, Italian Neo-realism, etc.). Where possible, we will trace the migration of forms, influences and determinations across national borders. We will situate developments within a broader atlas of historical events, and geographical areas: the Great Depression and New Deal politics; the buildup to World War II and its aftermath; the paranoia of the Cold War, etc.

One of our goals will be to acquire some comparative sense of often complex and simultaneous developments in films, styles, and film industries in multiple locations during this period. A second goal, inseparable from the first, will be to develop skills necessary to approach this period as an informed and questioning historian. To that end, readings, lectures and assignments (including a mid-term and final exam) are designed to facilitate your engagement with both primary and secondary critical sources.


MTWTh 11:30am - 1:20pm
SAV 137 - SLN: 11539
Instructor: Yomi Braester
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

The course explores the cinematographic, industrial, and ideological conditions of recent filmmaking, with an emphasis on postsocialist ideology and form, new forms of realism, transnational trends, the role of international film festivals, and the revision of cinematic traditions.

During weeks 1-8, class will meet for four meetings every week-two for screenings and two for lectures. The last two weeks are devoted to watching films at the Seattle International Film Festival.

This is a core course in the film studies track. Students are expected to be familiar with basic terms in film history and criticism.


TThF 11:30am - 1:20pm
MGH 251 - SLN: 11540
Instructor: Helene Vilavella
Department Requirements Met: Cinema Studies Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Examines the cinema of a particular national, ethnic or cultural group, with films typically shown in the original language with subtitles. Topics reflect themes and trends in the national cinema being studied.


MW 11:30am - 1:20pm
RAI 116 - SLN: 19694
Instructor: Elena Deem
Department Requirements Met: Literature Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Art and poetry entered into an unprecedented dialogue in the first three decades of the twentieth century when the revolutionary avant-garde movements swept through Europe. The radical stances of the avantgarde allowed for unorthodox responses to preoccupations motivated by the ever-increasing commodification of human experience which art and literature had shared for some time. Disturbing the boundaries between the two disciplines as well as between art, politics, and the general public, the avantgarde artists would reconceptualize text and image into forms which challenged classical aesthetic norms, the perceptual habits of their audience, and  the socio-cultural conditions of developed capitalism. We will examine the practices of a variety of avant-garde movements, some more and some less known, avoiding the dichotomy of margin versus center that often underpins avant-garde criticism. Besides Italy and France, we will thus venture to Spain, Czechoslovakia, and England. Our focus will be on the issues that the avant-garde opened up and tried to resolve by bringing text and image to near proximity, be it in the forms of collages, manifestos, artist books, and poem-pictures, or by a more loosely defined collaboration between poets and artists across the disciplines.
All readings will be in English.


TTh 1:30pm - 3:20pm
SAV 131 - SLN: 11541
Instructor: Naomi Sokoloff
Department Requirements Met: Elective for both Literature and Cinema
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Major themes of Jewish life treated in modern narrative and cinema. Topics include religious tradition and modernity. Jewish immigration to America, responses to the Holocaust, Zionism, and contemporary Israel. We will draw on principles of narrative theory and film theory to compare the telling and retelling of stories in different media.


MTWTh 12:30pm - 1:20pm
THO 134 - SLN: 11542
Instructor: Leroy Searle
Course Website
Department Requirements Met: Literature Core
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

Course website: http://uwch-4.humanities.washington.edu/classes/362

The central issue in this course will be the idea of MODERNISM. The course will be a reading course, with consistent focus on making sense of texts that have often seemed puzzling to readers. Given the range (and interest) of the assigned reading, considerable emphasis will be put on the discussion sections. There will be extensive guidance for all assignments. The guiding premise is that no one can write well if they do not first attending to reading intelligently. That will be our principal concern. I am not interested in reading papers that merely indulge unsupported opinions or that have been patched together from the internet. Accordingly, all writing assignments will be short and very specifically related to reading the texts assigned. The course is cross listed, with two sections, one in Comparative Literature and the other in English: there is no difference except for department designation, course number and title. The course will carry credit for majors in both departments, as well as distribution credit (VLPA). If one section is full, sign up for the other. Please note that all lectures will be recorded and posted daily on the Web site indicated above, to allow you to review anything presented in class. Attendance is required as the fundamental condition for participation in the course, and will be a factor in your final grade. This is not a course you can take in your pajamas.

We will read works by Shakespeare, John Milton, Immanuel Kant, Jean Jacques Rousseau, Wordsworth, Walt Whitman, Charles Baudelaire, Stephen Mallarmé, T. S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, William Carlos Williams, James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, Rainer Maria Rilke, Franz Kafka, Jorge Luis Borges, Wallace Stevens, Czeslaw Milosz, and Margaret Atwood. Most selections will be short, except as noted below in the list of texts.

You will notice that the list of readings does not follow the current convention of so-called “period courses,” in which, for example, a literary “period” is defined by beginning and ending dates. In the first days of the course, the conceptual, institutional, cultural and political issues that touch this matter will be discussed directly. Here, it is important to note that what counts as “modern” has always been relative to something viewed as “traditional,” or “conventional” or “ancient.” What makes something modern, that is to say, is never entirely determined by its date of publication—nor even by its use of certain formal devices or strategies. More generally, virtually all proposed “periods” qualified in their own times as “modern” inasmuch as they presented challenges to what had come before.

In a more fundamental sense, all of the works assigned in this course count as modern in the sense that they present a challenge to the status quo, to the commonplace, to received wisdom—and in that respect, their literary and cultural function is exceptionally important by posing, repeatedly, the question of the purpose or function of literary writing. Note also that the readings are not restricted to single cultural traditions (though for practical reasons, all the readings are available in English versions).

Texts:
Please note that YOU MUST USE THE ASSIGNED EDITIONS. You can realize very significant savings by buying most of these books on line, though the editions will all be available in the University Bookstore. The course reader is required and will be available at Professional Copy and Print (42nd and University Way). A PDF version will be posted on-line.

In U Bookstore:
William Shakespeare: Troilus and Cressida (Pelican Shakespeare) ISBN 0140714863
John Milton: Samson Agonistes (Crofts Classics edition) ISBN 0882950584
T. S. Eliot: Collected Poems 1909-1962 (Harcourt ) ISBN 0151189781
William Carlos Williams: Imaginations (New Directions) ISBN 0811202291
Virginia Woolf: To the Lighthouse (Oxford World Classics) ISBN 0199536619
James Joyce: Dubliners (Viking Revised, ed. Scholes & Litz) ISBN 0140247742

In the Course Reader: (Professional Copy and Print) (also on-line)
The Book of Ecclesiastes (from the King James Bible)
Clement Greenberg : “Modernist Painting”
Dieter Henrich: selection from Aesthetic Judgment and the Moral Image of the World.
Jean Jacques Rousseau: selection from Emile
Immanuel Kant : selections from Critique of the Power of Judgment
William Wordsworth: Preface to Lyrical Ballads (2nd edition)
Walt Whitman: Democratic Vistas
Franz Kafka: “Metamorphosis”, “In the Penal Colony” and selected parables
Jorge Luis Borges: “Tlon, Uqbar and Orbis Tertius,” and “The Circular Ruins”
Selected poetry & prose by
Emily Dickinson, Charles Baudelaire, Rainer Maria Rilke, Ezra Pound, Wallace Stevens, Czeslaw Milosz, and Margaret Atwood.


MTWTh 12:30pm - 1:20pm
DEN 216 - SLN: 11547
Instructor: Diana Behler
Department Requirements Met: Literature Elective
GE Requirements Met: VLPA

This course will focus on texts that exude the aura of the “fantastic” in German, English, American, French, and Russian literature, most originating in the 19th century. We will read and discuss stories by Tieck, Hoffmann, Kleist, Mary Shelley, Melville, Poe, Hawthorne, Schnitzler, and Gogol that deal wi th the phenomenon of the inscrutable in life and literature. We will also draw on various theories about demonic, gothic, fantastic, and romantic imagination (e.g., Freud, Todorov) and relate them to the texts we are analyzing.

Requirements: Active participation in discussions, several short paragraphs, mid-term exam, and a final take-home exam.


MTWTh 3:30pm - 5:20pm
EXED 110 - SLN: 11548
Instructor: Willis Konick
Department Requirements Met: Literature Elective
GE Requirements Met: VLPA, W

The class will meet two hours (twice a week) on film viewing days, one hour on lecture days (twice a week). Office hours are Fridays.

TEXTS: Naguib Mahfouz, "the Theif and the Dogs," "Miramar," "Midaq Alley"
FILMS: The Ghost Writer (Roman Polanski, High and Low (Akira Kurosawa), The Lady Eve (Preston Sturges), The Usual Suspects (Bryan Singer)

THEME OF CLASS: TRANSFORMATIONS
The most wonderful things happen when we are transformed. We fall in and sometimes out of love. We fall into careers. We fall into heroic exploits, missions we never imagined. We slip into happy dreams or discontent. And then slip out again. During this quarter we will view films in which an anonymous writer becomes a hero; a clever woman pays back the man who dumped her by shifting name and social class; a wealthy manufacturer is stripped of his fortune; and a crippled fellow begins to resemble the devil himself. We shall explore the transformation of a modern nation. Egypt and its current unrest will become our topic as we turn to short fiction by Egypt's fabulous writer, Naguib Mahfouz. Finally we will learn that only transformation gives full meaning to our life in time. For when the transformation passes, affable time returns to greet us. Class assignments: two take-home essays (midquarter and final). The instructor and his assistant will offer individual help for both essays.


MW 4:30pm - 7:20pm
SAV 162 - SLN: 11556
Instructor: Jennifer M. Bean

Provides a basic grounding in the theory, history, and criticism of film and media studies, and introduces central debates, topics, and methods in the field.


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