C LIT 323: Studies In The Literature Of Emerging Nations

Historical Fiction and Post/Colonialism in Southeast Asia and Africa
Section ID: 
A
 
SLN: 
11720
 
Meets Department Requirements: 
Literature Core
 
Meets GE Requirements: 
Visual, Literary, and Performing Arts
 
Meets Other Requirements: 

Instructor:

 
T Th 11:30-13:20
 
SMI 205
Novels and short stories, from Africa, the Middle East, and South Asia. Discusses relationship of Western literary genres to an oral literary tradition, as well as issues like colonialism, gender relations, narrative technique, native and non-native languages.

What is the relationship between history and literature? What is the “nation” and how can its story be told? Who can tell it? The novels, short stories, and films in this course will be drawn from the Philippines, Indonesia, Algeria, Senegal, Zimbabwe, and Vietnam in order to discuss how the appearance and development of nations, nationalism, and nation-states are tied to historical imagination and cultural production. Understanding how the categories of “literature” and “nation”—which often seem quite distinct or wholly unrelated—might relate to one another in distinct contexts will be the main goal of this course, as well as articulating the imagining of a past with the experience of the present. This will be achieved by historical contextualization, analysis of texts, and the support of theoretical texts. Some topics that may be considered in developing our understanding of these relationships are: the modernity of the nation form; genealogies of race and racism; colonialism, post-colonialism, and neo-colonialism; the production of gender identities and their relation to nationalism; narrative technique; and native and non-native languages, their transmission, and transcription.

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Last updated: February 20, 2014 - 9:11pm